19
Apr
unnamed (1)

One of the more far-reaching Android Police stories this year was our exclusive write-up of Virus Shield, an impressively popular anti-virus app that managed to make it to the top of the Play Store's sales charts in less than a week, despite the fact that it did absolutely nothing. After digging into the app's code, Artem Russakovskii and various Android Police readers found that it was nothing more than a few images and a toggle.

06
Apr
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Last Updated: April 10th, 2014

Computer security is important, even if the computer in question fits in your hand. There should be no doubt about that fact. However, you should be just as wary of security software as any other app. Case in point: there's a slick new app in the Play Store called Virus Shield. It's got a cool look and it's easy to operate. Just press a single button and your virus shield is activated.

20
Oct
Untitled-8

On the evening of the 18th, Chinese tech site CtechCN began the circulation of an image representing an all-white variant of the Nexus 5, with the accompanying story that, according to a tipster, the white variant could be launched simultaneously with the black version, and presumably the version we've already seen with a white back and black front.

Nexus-5-White

Tantalizing, right? The first issue with this image is the lighting. The highlights are all toward the bottom.

23
Jun
bbmfake

This morning we were alerted to a possible Blackberry Messenger sighting in the Play Store, but upon closer inspection, it was immediately obvious that this app is beyond fake. The problem is it already has 100,000+ installs, it's been sitting in the Play Store since Friday, and Google hasn't done anything to remove the listing yet.

Update 6/23/13 4:25pm PT: The fake app has been taken down.

Distractions

I can see three big problems that are currently distracting unsuspecting users and making them ignore any other possible warning signs:

  1. The developer's name is RIM, which looks pretty damn official.
02
Apr
image

Yesterday, BorrowLenses, a site that rents gear to photo and video enthusiasts, posted up a rental page for Google Glass and a matching blog post. Those interested were invited to rent Glass on April 30th. The prices started at $105 for 3 days all the way to $499 for 4 weeks. With the developer version of Glass going for $1500, this didn't sound like such a bad idea if you were just looking to see how it worked without a huge commitment.

24
Oct
2012-10-24_09h11_40

Just a little while ago, the first purported press shots of the LG Nexus 4 hit Twitter, thanks to EVLeaks. Almost immediately after looking at the image, though, it's clear something's... not right.

1

Let's start with the notification bar - look familiar? If you've ever run the AOKP ROM, it should. Both the centered clock and battery percentage (the one actually in the battery icon - it's barely visible in the render) are signature customizations of the ROM.

19
Oct
image

UPDATE 3: EVLeaks has now rescinded his previous statements.

While we don't appreciate the manner in which EVLeaks (and others) initially approached this situation with conspiracy theories, baseless accusations, and speculation, we appreciate EVLeaks' withdrawal of previous comments, and our readers' support through the entire episode.

15
Oct
image

Earlier today, a couple of rather exciting photos found on Picasa began hitting news sites showing what could be a leaked device called the Sony Nexus X. Of course, during Nexus season, any rumor or glance at a possible new device is always exciting, but sometimes it's worth while to take a step back and consider whether what we're looking at is actually what it appears to be. Our penchant for putting leaked images under the microscope led us to do a bit of investigating.

17
Sep
image

Remember HTC's 5" mystery device we caught a glimpse of last month? Well, according to Engadget, a user of China's popular social network Weibo earlier revealed what may (or may not) be an official press shot of the device – a shot which also reveals the device's potential name – the HTC One X 5 (named, obviously, for its ample display size).

Engadget has "reason to believe [this] is an authentic press image of the finished result," but we're always skeptical of leaked press shots, and after putting the image under a magnifying glass, we're not so sure.

02
Apr
alienstiny

Way back in the day, if you wanted to know if a piece of software was safe, reliable, or usable before you opened the package, you were out of luck. Once you rip that shrink wrap, you're stuck with it. The app markets of today are, by comparison, a breath of fresh air. A litany of user reviews let you know up front if a piece of software is crap or not before you download.

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