19
Mar
Huawei-Thumb

Huawei recently shared plans to release a dual-OS Android/Windows device in the US come Q2 of this year. Now, the company has publically stepped back from those words. It didn't provide an explanation, but it did emphasize its "open approach" towards mobile operating systems and a desire to provide "a range of choices for consumers." Most of the Huawei's handsets will continue to run Android, and while Windows Phone still isn't off the table completely, the two platforms won't play along anytime soon.

14
Mar
thingy

There comes a point in a person's life when he or she may be looking for a new device of some sort, and trying to fulfill multiple roles at once could be important. For example, a tablet/laptop hybrid may be sought after by someone who doesn't have the disposable income to justify having one of each. These types of devices – like recently-announced ASUS Transformer Book Duet – are, in my opinion, a great option in that situation.

13
Mar
Huawei-Thumb

Huawei likes Windows Phone. However, it thinks the mobile OS would taste better when served alongside Android. That's why, despite expressing commitment to Microsoft's platform, the company reportedly plans to bring a dual-booting Android/Windows Phone handset to the US sometime this spring.

Here's Huawei Chief Marketing Officer Shao Yang, speaking with TrustedReviews:

“With Windows Phone, one direction for us – and one that we are now following – is dual OS.

06
Jan
TD300_Detached_Dual OSm

Asus likes to explore unusual designs for its Android devices, as one look at the Padfone X will tell you. Another fresh take on mobile devices announced at CES comes in the form of the Asus Transformer Book Duet. This is a convertible laptop/tablet hybrid that dual-boots Windows 8.1 and Android 4.2.2. It also packs some serious laptop-grade hardware.

TD300_Cut_10

04
Oct
htctwo

Back many moons ago, HTC and Microsoft we're buddy-buddy. HTC was producing Windows Mobile devices, Microsoft was happy to be one of the leaders in the smartphone business, and everything chugged along nicely. Then the iPhone and Android showed up, changed the smartphone game completely, and Microsoft was essentially left in the dust. The company has since been trying to get back in the ring with Windows Phone, but high licensing costs and lack of third-party support make this an unappealing option to many hardware vendors – why pay for the OS (Windows Phone), when you can get one for free (Android)?

Quantcast