21
May
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The Google Play Newsstand Android app is pretty and all, but without the ability to subscribe to magazines, it's little more than a dumbed down pseudo-RSS reader. So it's a pretty good thing Google is rolling out access to the digital magazines to more countries. By now, residents in France and Germany should have access to the Newsstand content available in Google Play.

04
Jan
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When Google first launched Play Magazines, there was an immediate backlash from users who were already subscribed to paper magazines that offer a free digital copy, as there was no way to grab said digital subscription from Google. Instead, these users were treated as if they had no prior subscription at all and were effectively forced to pay again if they wanted to read on their mobile device. Needless to say, that didn't go over very well.

27
Dec
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If you've been searching for a way to safely play your Android phone's music library in the rain or at the beach, Amazon's got a deal for you. Grace Digital's ECO X Terra (orange only) is available for just $50 shipped, which is a notable $100 discount over its original price.

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If you're wondering how the ECO X Terra works, it's simple – just cram your Android-powered phone (or "any mp3 player") into the center compartment, and enjoy your tunes.

09
May
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ShoeBox, an app that represents 1000memories' first foray into the Play Store, is an awesome digital photo organizer, "turning your Android device into a mobile photo scanner," and allowing for sophisticated organization, storage, and sharing of your treasured paper photos.

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For those that can't exactly hold their device with machine precision when scanning old photos, ShoeBox offers edge detection and perspective correction, ensuring that your newly-digitized photos won't be distorted or misshapen.

04
Apr
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We've heard whispers that the powers that be have been working on a bulk subscription service for magazines. Now, they're finally delivering it. Next Issue offers users a very Netflix-like subscription service that includes unlimited access to current and some older issues of a selection of magazines for $10 a month. Or, for $15 a month you can get a slightly bigger selection of magazines. Yes, it's tiered.

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At the moment, the selection is particularly small, though it does offer quite a few big name magazines.

08
Jun
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While snooping around the Market this afternoon, I ran into Adobe's newly released product called simply Adobe® Content Viewer. With almost no description and usage instructions, I spent about an hour familiarizing myself with Adobe's Digital Publishing Suite which apparently creates content this Content Viewer is supposed to consume (read: display).

So, what does it mean in layman's terms? Content creators, such as magazine and newspaper publishers, use the Digital Publishing Suite to create distributable versions of their products, and the cross-platform (iOS, Android, Blackberry, etc) Content Viewer lets users sign into their Adobe accounts and view digital subscriptions on their mobile platforms of choice.

05
Mar
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The Android market is filled with apps of questionable legality. But oftentimes, overpriced, branded theme and clock apps like those you'll find here are considered relatively harmless - who's stupid enough to buy them, anyway? Still, apps in this category are in clear violation of registered trademarks - and that doesn't sit well with their holders.

Google even has a page for developers and copyright holders to submit DMCA takedown requests for apps on the Market.

26
Jul
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If you’ve cruised the blogosphere today, you’ve probably noticed a number of articles talking about the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), and the Library of Congress having decided to add a few exemptions to the sweeping piece of legislation’s authority. Why is this a big deal? And is it a big deal at all?

On the latter, in some ways yes, and I’ll explain why only some later. For the former, it signifies a change in attitude over what constitutes infringement of digital copyright for two major pieces of technology, one of which we’re interested in here at Android Police (take a guess at what sort of technology that is).