05
Sep
image

Eric Schmidt has just left the stage at Motorola's "On Display" event in New York. Before leaving, though, he divulged some interesting new Android-related numbers.

First among them was the latest figure for "activations per day," which tracks the total number of new Android devices activated each and every day. You may remember Andy Rubin revealing that number to be around 900,000 while quashing rumors back in June, but according to Schmidt, the total number of daily activations has now topped 1.3 million.

10
Aug
image

As most of our readers are surely aware, the Apple vs Samsung case is still boiling, and over the course of nearly two weeks since the trial's beginning, document after document has revealed juicy details from both sides regarding previously unreleased designs, plans, and even sales figures. While so far we've avoided piecemeal coverage of the case's twists and turns, a new development (reported earlier this evening by The Verge) reveals something particularly interesting.

27
Jul
wm_IMG_1493

The time has come friends. Factory images are now available for several Nexus devices. The current factory image (JRO03[C-E] depending on the device) is available for most Nexus S variants, though the Korean and Sprint versions are conspicuously absent. Similarly, the Verizon-branded Galaxy Nexus is still off the list, but all other Galaxy Nexus versions are accounted for. And, of course, the carrier-less Nexus 7's factory image is available.

For those who prefer bullet points, here are the devices with factory images available as well as the build number for each:

 

  • Nexus S (soju): Android 4.1.1 (JRO03E)
  • Nexus S (sojua): Android 4.1.1 (JRO03E)
  • Galaxy Nexus (yakju): Android 4.1.1 (JRO03C)
  • Galaxy Nexus (takju): Android 4.1.1 (JRO03C)
  • Nexus 7 (nakasi): Android 4.1.1 (JRO03D)

If you need to get back to the way things were when you first got your device, you can download the images from Google's download site right here.

25
Jul
2012-07-25_15h00_12

The Google Dashboard is a handy tool for keeping up with what information Google has stored for you in its various different products. One piece of the handy information, though, has taken a while to become available but it's there now: your Android devices. It's unclear if this feature has been around for a while, but either way, it's useful. If you'd like to see which devices are registered with Google, and more interestingly, which apps on those devices have backups stored on Google's servers, you can do so from your dashboard.

02
Jul
unnamed (1)

Perhaps the most popular (and complete) free repair manual in existence, iFixit, launched an official app for Android recently, bringing detailed step-by-step repair instructions and (of course) the saucy teardown images we've come to know and love from the service's online counterpart to your Android devices.

For those who don't know, iFixit provides users with incredibly detailed repair guides for a huge variety of things from laptops to mobile devices, game consoles, and even cars, including great imagery and nice explanations for why hardware is the way it is.

15
Jun
image

Those of you who have been waiting for a stable Android 2.3.7 build for your device from CyanogenMod are in luck - the first stable CyanogenMod 7.2 builds have just been released for an absolute slew of devices. For those who don't feel like decoding all the code-names for themselves, here's a handy list of supported devices (at the time of writing – more devices are being added):

Barnes&Noble

  • NOOK Color (encore)

HTC

  • Hero CDMA
  • myTouch 4G (glacier)
  • myTouch 3G Slide (espresso)
  • Desire (bravo)
  • Desire HD
  • Tattoo (click)
  • Wildfire (buzz)
  • Incredible (inc)
  • Incredible 2 (vivow)
  • Droid Eris (desirec)

LG

  • myTouch T 4G (e739)
  • Optimus Sol (e730)
  • Optimus Hub (e510)
  • Optimus Pro (c660)

Motorola

  • Droid 2 (Global)

Samsung

  • Galaxy S (galaxy smtd/sbmtd)
  • Galaxy SII (AT&T and international)
  • Fascinate
  • Nexus S/4G (Crespo/4G)
  • Galaxy Ace

Sony Ericsson

  • Xperia Pro MK16 (iyokan)
  • Xperia Neo (Hallon)
  • Live w/ Walkman (coconut)
  • Xperia Arc (Anzu)
  • Xperia Ray (urushi)
  • Xperia Play (zeus)
  • Xperia Mini/Pro (smultron/mango)

ZTE

  • Blade

Arcee notes in a post to the CyanogenMod blog that 7.2 brings a few backported ICS features and a few important bug fixes to a list of devices which includes 20 more than the list of 7.1 recipients.

05
Jun
unnamed

Open Garden is hands down one of the most impressive apps I've seen this year. The app, first introduced at TechCrunch Disrupt NYC 2012 as the startup that would go on to win the conference title of Most Innovative Startup, allows users to create an "open garden" of internet connectivity for multiple devices to share. The startup's official website explains it this way:

The operators sell us fancy handsets, but behave as if broken networks are a fact of life.

24
May
androidos

If we told you that Android was the number one mobile OS worldwide, you shouldn't really be surprised by this point. By most metrics, the little green guy has overtaken the competition in just about every area, including sales, actual userbase, and ad impressions, as demonstrated here by Millenial Media's report. There are a couple surprises in the report, though.

2012-05-24_13h15_02

For starters, while the iPad being the top ranked tablet is no surprise, the Galaxy Tab beating out the Kindle Fire is.

16
May
googlemusictiny

Well, that didn't take long. Earlier today, we reported that Google was limiting the number of devices that can be deauthorized from your Google Music account. The official limit on Google Music devices was 10 active devices, with the proviso that up to 4 devices could be removed from your account every year. As of this moment, the Google Music help page still echoes this, but Google might be back pedaling.

16
May
googlemusictiny

The problem with any account-based music streaming service, from a corporate standpoint, is that end users are a shared password away from getting access to free media. Really, who hasn't shared their Netflix account once or twice? In an effort to prevent this kind of abuse, Google Music (likely at the request of the music labels) has instituted a cap on the number of devices you are allowed to deauthorize: Four.

Page 2 of 41234
Quantcast