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development

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AOSP Developer Changelog Posted For v5.1.1_r4 (LMY47Z) To v5.1.1_r5 (LYZ28E), And It's Actually Quite Long

It seems like the only thing anybody can talk about is Android M, but we should remember that we've got about 4 more months with Lollipop v5.1.1 as the current version until Mango Mojito (probably not) is officially released in October. This is no more apparent than when an update appears on AOSP and brings with it thousands of changes. In fact, this update is large enough it probably deserved more than a barely noticeable revision bump.

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[Breakfast Meat] Google's M-Preview Developer Docs Are Packed With A Bit Of Bacon-y Goodness

There was a time when we thought bacon could make almost anything better. We were wrong... It can make everything better! Things started simple with bacon appearing on breakfast plates, hamburgers, and sandwiches. Society eventually aimed higher with more creative endeavors like bacon ice cream, bacon-wrapped pizza, and of course, bacon-wrapped bacon. We couldn't even stop there because cocktail culture simply wasn't complete without bacon-flavored vodka. Why am I talking so much about bacon?

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Android M Developer Preview AOSP Changelog Posted, Probably Not A Complete Platform Release

The Android M Developer Preview was released just yesterday and we're all very closely examining the changes. While there's still quite a bit to dig through, it looks like Google is getting some of the source code up right away. Before anybody gets too excited, it's likely that this code dump occurred to ensure GPL compliance. However, there are quite a few projects in the changelog that wouldn't normally require updates due to licensing, so there may be quite a bit more going live on this release.

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[I/O 2015] Android Studio v1.3 Developer Preview Adds C/C++ Support With Refactoring, Code Completion, And Debugging Capabilities

Google I/O is first and foremost a developer conference. New products may be announced at the keynote, but just about everything is really meant for the people that build the apps. For Android developers, there are few things that matter more than their tools. Today, a fresh release of Android Studio hit the Canary channel, and it brings one of the most often requested features: C/C++ support.

Android apps, as most people think of them, are usually written in Java and have a runtime environment that imposes some additional overhead on execution.

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Google Begins Selling Project Tango Tablet Invitation-Free For $512

Back in April, some Project Tango invitees reported that the tablet development kit's price had dropped from $1024 down to the "special price" of $512. In an email notification to invited buyers, Google advised, "We're opening up sales more broadly, so now is the last chance to buy the device we've reserved for you."

Evidently Google wasn't joking, as today Project Tango can be bought for the same $512 price invite-free from the Google Store.

Screen Shot 2015-05-27 at 8.41.25 PM

Dropping the invitation requirement just one day before the 2015 I/O keynote is certainly an interesting move, and may suggest that Google will have more to tell us about its 3D sensing and tracking efforts during the conference.

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[For Developers] LeakCanary By Square Is A Low-Effort Library For Easily Tracking Down Memory Leaks In Android Apps

Writing great, high-quality software is hard work. No matter how well we know a platform or how long we spend on code, there are bound to be bugs. Memory leaks are among the most common problems, and they can be particularly disruptive on mobile devices. Square set out to make memory leaks easier to track down and fix with a new library called LeakCanary. It makes leak detection almost automatic and presents results in both logcat and an easy-to-read interface.

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LeakCanary is designed to be as easy to use as possible. For most applications, it should only require a few additional lines in the app's build.gradle file, and one more line of code in your Application class.

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[Update: Winners] Win One Of Five Tickets To LG's 3rd Annual Developer Event At Google I/O

 

This contest is now over.

The final results are listed below. If you've won, you will be contacted in the near future. Congratulations!

Everyone else - keep participating and stay tuned to Android Police so that you don't miss our upcoming giveaway announcements. You can follow AP on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, and RSS.

  1. Andy Tu
  2. Damir Sabirov
  3. Colby Simpson
  4. Denis Sobolev
  5. Yudhistira Erlandinata

Google I/O attracts thousands of developers from around the world to San Francisco, California for a few days each year. Combined with the already dense population of tech companies, it's an opportunity to hold parties and events to build relationships with developers.

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[Update: Winners] 10 Chances To Win One Of Six Different Android Development Books From Packt Publishing And Android Police

As much as we all love to live in a digital world, there's just no replacing books. Sure, ebooks are good - but there's something awesome about having a physical copy and flipping through the pages. That's especially true if you're already using your computer for something else - you know, like work. Let me give an example.

Let's say you're a developer, and you're working on...something. You're having issues squashing a bug or getting a specific feature to work the way you want. Then you remember that you have this killer book from Packt Publishing on the shelf behind you that covers the very thing you're having an issue with you.

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Google Is Working On A High Performance, Java-Free App Framework For Android Based On Dart

Most of the standard (non-game) Android apps we use today are created with Java. Alternatives are available, like Apache Cordova and Mono for Android, but there's no doubt that Java is the only true first-class citizen. However, a team at Google is now working on a new cross-platform alternative called Sky, and it's able to deliver 120 FPS out of the box.

Sky is based on Dart, a custom web scripting language that emerged from Chrome's V8 development team. Dart was designed to make development of complicated Javascript applications faster and more manageable, but it also came with the advantage of higher performance and the ability to be distributed as compiled code.

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InBrief
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Android Studio 1.2 Moves Into The Stable Channel

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