Android Police

Articles Tagged:

development

...

Android Studio v1.3 Released To Stable Channel, Includes Support For C/C++, NDK, Data Binding, And More

A preview of Android Studio v1.3 made its first appearance at the Google I/O 2015 session What's New in Android Development Tools, which introduced a number of significant improvements and additions. The biggest announcement was about the integration of JetBrains Clion, enabling Android Studio to be used for C/C++ development, and ultimately support app development with the Native Development Kit (NDK). After a few months in development and about 3 weeks in the Canary channel, version 1.3 has been promoted to a Stable release.

ndk_jni_editor

Support for C/C++ development is still considered an "Early Access Preview," so it's probably not quite ready for larger projects.

Read More
...

Microsoft Releases Standalone Android Emulator With Easy Instructions To Use It With Android Studio And Eclipse With ADT

Microsoft surprised Android developers last year with the launch of a brand new emulator designed for performance and features that aren't available anywhere else. While the initial Preview release only included an image for KitKat, subsequent updates introduced an expanded set of emulator images and some valuable new features. While a high-speed emulator is certainly compelling, many developers still didn't adopt it because it had to be downloaded and installed alongside a very large Visual Studio package, not to mention it was also frustrating to set up for use with other IDEs. Last week, Microsoft unburdened the emulator and released it as a standalone download along with step-by-step instructions to set it up to easily run with Android Studio and Eclipse with ADT.

Read More
...

Android Studio v1.3 RC1 Enters Canary Release Channel, Adds Full Preview Support For C/C++ And NDK

A large part of the What's New in Android Development Tools session at Google I/O 2015 focused on one particular feature, or rather, group of features coming to Android Studio: upcoming support for C/C++ and the Android NDK. Version 1.3 RC1 of the IDE hit the canary channel late yesterday, finally enabling developers of native apps and games to begin transitioning from Eclipse (or another IDE) to Android Studio, if they choose to. Functionality is described as "preview quality," so there are still some known issues and probably quite a few bugs.

Screen Shot 2015-07-10 at 3.06.13 AM

With the addition of NDK support, this release brings a number of internal and organizational changes, some of which will affect all developers.

Read More
...

Google Officially Ends Support For ADT With Eclipse, Urges Android Developers To Migrate Projects To Android Studio

It's been a long and winding road, but the days of Eclipse with ADT are over. In a post on the Android development blog, Google has announced that development and official support for the Android Development Tools plugin for Eclipse will be shut down at the end of this year. Google intends to focus all of its effort on improving Android Studio and advises developers move their active projects to Android Studio using the included migration tool.

This news comes about six months after Google declared the ADT plugin was no longer in active development. The change in status meant the tools would only receive bug fixes and updates necessary to remain functional, but there would be no more improvements or new features.

Read More
...

AOSP Developer Changelog Posted For v5.1.1_r4 (LMY47Z) To v5.1.1_r5 (LYZ28E), And It's Actually Quite Long

It seems like the only thing anybody can talk about is Android M, but we should remember that we've got about 4 more months with Lollipop v5.1.1 as the current version until Mango Mojito (probably not) is officially released in October. This is no more apparent than when an update appears on AOSP and brings with it thousands of changes. In fact, this update is large enough it probably deserved more than a barely noticeable revision bump.

2015-06-25_09h14_10

The code drop for LYZ28E comes a bit later than expected, since the build number was first seen in a Nexus 6 update that began rolling out a month ago.

Read More
...

[Breakfast Meat] Google's M-Preview Developer Docs Are Packed With A Bit Of Bacon-y Goodness

There was a time when we thought bacon could make almost anything better. We were wrong... It can make everything better! Things started simple with bacon appearing on breakfast plates, hamburgers, and sandwiches. Society eventually aimed higher with more creative endeavors like bacon ice cream, bacon-wrapped pizza, and of course, bacon-wrapped bacon. We couldn't even stop there because cocktail culture simply wasn't complete without bacon-flavored vodka. Why am I talking so much about bacon? Because this tasty meat has been sprinkled on top the API Overview page in the M-Preview SDK developer documentation. Take a look:

SoooooooMeaty

What you're seeing above is "bacon ipsum," a delicious alternative to the lorem ipsum commonly used in graphic design and publishing as filler until a final copy is written.

Read More
...

Android M Developer Preview AOSP Changelog Posted, Probably Not A Complete Platform Release

The Android M Developer Preview was released just yesterday and we're all very closely examining the changes. While there's still quite a bit to dig through, it looks like Google is getting some of the source code up right away. Before anybody gets too excited, it's likely that this code dump occurred to ensure GPL compliance. However, there are quite a few projects in the changelog that wouldn't normally require updates due to licensing, so there may be quite a bit more going live on this release.

The entire changelog totals about 29,000 commits and weighs in at about 4.7 MB. It's not entirely clear where the official starting point would be, but we generated the changelog from 5.1.1_r4, which is currently the latest release available.

Read More
...

[I/O 2015] Android Studio v1.3 Developer Preview Adds C/C++ Support With Refactoring, Code Completion, And Debugging Capabilities

Google I/O is first and foremost a developer conference. New products may be announced at the keynote, but just about everything is really meant for the people that build the apps. For Android developers, there are few things that matter more than their tools. Today, a fresh release of Android Studio hit the Canary channel, and it brings one of the most often requested features: C/C++ support.

Android apps, as most people think of them, are usually written in Java and have a runtime environment that imposes some additional overhead on execution. Games and other performance-critical software are usually built with C or C++ and the Native Development Kit (NDK) so that they can avoid most of that overhead.

Read More
...

Google Begins Selling Project Tango Tablet Invitation-Free For $512

Back in April, some Project Tango invitees reported that the tablet development kit's price had dropped from $1024 down to the "special price" of $512. In an email notification to invited buyers, Google advised, "We're opening up sales more broadly, so now is the last chance to buy the device we've reserved for you."

Evidently Google wasn't joking, as today Project Tango can be bought for the same $512 price invite-free from the Google Store.

Screen Shot 2015-05-27 at 8.41.25 PM

Dropping the invitation requirement just one day before the 2015 I/O keynote is certainly an interesting move, and may suggest that Google will have more to tell us about its 3D sensing and tracking efforts during the conference.

Read More
...

[For Developers] LeakCanary By Square Is A Low-Effort Library For Easily Tracking Down Memory Leaks In Android Apps

Writing great, high-quality software is hard work. No matter how well we know a platform or how long we spend on code, there are bound to be bugs. Memory leaks are among the most common problems, and they can be particularly disruptive on mobile devices. Square set out to make memory leaks easier to track down and fix with a new library called LeakCanary. It makes leak detection almost automatic and presents results in both logcat and an easy-to-read interface.

screenshot

LeakCanary is designed to be as easy to use as possible. For most applications, it should only require a few additional lines in the app's build.gradle file, and one more line of code in your Application class.

Read More
Page 1 of 1912345...10...Last»
Quantcast