17
Aug
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After dropping source code for the Wi-Fi Galaxy Tab 7.0 Plus (along with the Galaxy Note 10.1 and Tab 10.1) just last week, Samsung is once again providing eager developers with something to play with over the weekend, releasing kernel source code for T-Mobile's variants of both the Galaxy Note and the Galaxy Tab 7.0 to their Opensource download center.

Both packages carry source code for their respective devices' Ice Cream Sandwich-powered kernels.

11
Aug
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In a (relatively) timely release, Samsung has given eager developers something to play with over the weekend – the manufacturer recently dropped Ice Cream Sandwich kernel source code for a handful of devices including three variants of the Galaxy Note 10.1 (the N8000, 8010, and 8013), the Wi-Fi Galaxy Tab 7.0 Plus, and both 3G and Wi-Fi variants of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 (P7500 and 7510).

The release comes just days after the official Note 10.1 launch, source code release for the Korean Carrier-connected variant of the Note 10.1, and the discovery of a successful root method for the device.

30
Jul
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Last Updated: July 31st, 2012

One of the great things about Android's ecosystem is the number of indie developers who are able to enter the market successfully, providing a great product and inspiring would-be developers to join in. For many though, Android development in general is a mysterious topic. How an app or game goes from an idea to an entry in the Play Store is unknown, but (thankfully) not unknowable.

Of course, considering how major development studios bring apps to life doesn't require too much thought – major companies like EA, Disney, or Rockstar have no problem hiring designers and developers to crank out and maintain polished apps.

25
Jul
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Long after releasing the kernel source for other variants of the One X (as well as the US One S and EVO LTE), HTC has finally released the source for AT&T's variant.

Users may recall that the AT&T-connected One X was left out of the initial kernel source code drop just after HTC delivered a somewhat disheartening statement to the Verge indicating that the device was not eligible to participate in the Taiwanese manufacturer's bootloader unlocking program due to unspecified "restrictions," which many users read as "AT&T says no."

While it appears that the AT&T-connected One X still isn't compatible with HTC's bootloader unlocking tool (and may never be), the release of its kernel source code is still positive news for tweakers, tinkerers, and developers alike.

10
Jul
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If there is one major downside to the custom development community, it's that the sheer volume of minor variations in custom ROMs and largely-borrowed development makes it difficult, if not impossible to find real, quality development. XDA aims to change this by creating Original Development forums. These special forums will be reserved for projects that adhere to a set of rules, not the least of which is being largely original work.

03
Jul
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In a post to the Android Building group earlier today, Jean-Baptiste Queru announced that Samsung's Nexus S 4G has officially and fully been brought into the AOSP fold. The device is now fully supported by AOSP, meaning its CDMA – and WiMax – binaries can now be "properly" distributed. Here's the full text of the announcement:

We've been able to resolve the issues around Nexus S 4G, and we can now properly distribute its CDMA and WiMAX binaries.

18
Jun
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Just over two weeks after the official Galaxy SIII announcement, and days before its target launch date, Samsung has released the ICS open source files for AT&T's own Galaxy SIII (otherwise known as SGH-I747M), as well as T-Mobiles variant - the SGH-T999V. These releases are in keeping with Samsung's recent pattern of timely source code drops, which has certainly been encouraging for developers looking to tinker with one of the hottest Android devices available.

31
May
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Mere days after its (official) launch in 28 countries worldwide, Samsung's Galaxy SIII – perhaps the most hotly anticipated Android phone to date – can be tweaked and modded by eager developers the world over. That's right, Samsung officially dropped the I9300's source code today at the manufacturer's Open Source Release Center.

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While those of us in North America wait (im)patiently for the SIII's release, those looking to get their hands on the device's source need only stop by its listing at the OSRC here, or head over to github (here), where user chirayudesai has already uploaded the (unzipped) source into three branches: master, stock, and stock_update1.

21
May
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There are countless methods out there for learning Android development from the Android Bootcamp video series to the boatload of print publications currently in circulation to Google's own Android tutorials. Looking to create something both unique and helpful however, Android Cookbook has compiled a crowd-sourced set of recipes for "writing great Android apps," making them available for free online.

The online cookbook, which relies on user recipe submission and group moderation, was recently finalized for publication by O'Reilly, meaning it's now available both on the web and in print from various retailers.

06
May
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Keeping up with its trend of timely code release, HTC dropped kernel source code for the HTC One X today, the same day the device became available through AT&T. The code release includes kernel source for the One X across a range of carriers and regions, including Optus, T-Mobile, Orange, Vodafone, and more, though the list notably excludes AT&T.

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While HTC's release of One X kernel source is certainly a step in the right direction, the AT&T variant's absence is unsettling, and many are no doubt still wondering when (or if) the device may be allowed into HTC's bootloader unlock program after a controversial statement from the manufacturer Friday.

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