11
Jul
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The Android development community couldn't be more on fire today now that Android 4.1 has been fully open sourced. While the Jelly Bean flavored CyanogenMod 10 is not just here just yet (though work has already begun), the CyanogenMod team released a fantastic treat for new Galaxy S III owners on AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile - official nightlies, available for downloading and flashing right now:

  • Galaxy S III for AT&T (d2att)
  • Galaxy S III for Sprint (d2spr)
  • Galaxy S III for T-Mobile (d2tmo)

Definition: A "nightly" is a bleeding edge release that is built on a daily basis, usually at night after a full day's worth of new code has been committed.

21
Feb
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Last Updated: June 3rd, 2012

The boot animation from CyanogenMod 7 still ranks somewhere towards the top of my personal list, but this new one, created by the same designer Cameron Behzadpour (73v1n) using Adobe After Effects, is definitely a step-up.

It builds on top of his previous effort and is quite possibly the best-looking boot animation I've seen on Android so far. And it's officially coming to CM9. Excellent work, Cameron!

Update: Check out this unofficial take on the same animation, but without as much background noise that some of you may prefer:

Via: CyanogenMod Plus

07
Feb
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Steve Kondik (aka Cyanogen) put out a public update to the situation with CyanogenMod 9 earlier today, and revealed a few interesting tidbits about Team Douche's progress. Here's a few excerpts we thought were particularly important:

Android 4.0 contains many internal changes that require updated graphics drivers. Unfortunately, these drivers are almost always closed-source and don’t appear until a device or devkit is released with them. For many devices, our hands are tied...

15
Nov
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In case you were wondering or had any doubt at all, the CyanogenMod 9 wheels are now in motion (as promised), and in a few months (likely weeks for nightlies) delicious ICS will drip onto 68+ supported Android devices, some completely forgotten by carriers and manufacturers. If you ask me, that's the best thing that could happen to them anyway - what do carriers know about keeping their devices up-to-date with Android, right?

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