10
Jan
1

Amazon introduced today a new service that gives back to customers who have purchased physical CDs over the last 15 years. Yes, fifteen. It's called AutoRip, and it essentially offers free MP3s of CDs purchased since 1998. If you've been buying music from Amazon for a while, this is absolutely killer. It's worth noting that not all titles are eligible for AutoRip due to licensing restrictions, but Amazon is adding more AutoRip-eligible titles "all the time."

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Just like with other Amazon music purchases, the AutoRip tracks go straight to your Cloud Player library and don't count against Cloud Storage limits.

18
Sep
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Hot on the heels of its Kindle Fire launch in the UK, Amazon has now made its Cloud Player available to British customers.

Like the U.S. Cloud Player, any purchases made on Amazon's MP3 store can be stored online free of charge. If users want to upload their music library to Cloud Player, they can store 250 tracks for free. Users with larger libraries can pay £21.99 per year for the premium service, which can store up to 250,000 tracks.

18
May
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Last Updated: July 24th, 2011

When Amazon Cloud Player hit the scene, my exact words were "Google Music who?" and now that Google Music Beta invites are starting to rollout to the masses, I can aptly answer that question.

I've used Amazon Cloud Player as the primary music player on my Android phone since its inception at the end of March, so I've become quite familiar with how it works. The service has its pros and cons (like any service, I suppose), but overall I am a big fan.

06
Apr
1

If you are a fan of the music streaming service Grooveshark, life just got a little worse for you, because as of yesterday, you will no longer find it in the Android Market. While no specifics were mentioned, we know that Google was forced to pull the app due to a violation in the terms of service and possibly some pressure from record labels.

It hasn't been an easy road for Grooveshark since the beginning, as most record labels feel that it promotes piracy by allowing users to upload and share their own tracks.

29
Mar
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While some companies are content to just talk, talk, talk about what they are doing, Amazon seems to be quietly hard at work. Last week they gave us the Amazon Appstore for Android and last night they dropped another bomb – the Amazon Cloud Player.

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If Grooveshark and Dropbox had a baby, it would be Amazon Cloud Player. It consists of Cloud Drive - 5GB of free cloud storage on Amazon’s servers (upgradable to 20GB with the purchase of one album or for $20/year; $1 per gigabyte after that) - and the Cloud Player, which can be accessed from the web or from an Android device.

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