07
Apr
hi-256-1-c8c36fbd452c23e26d4b64052a7244afe473118c

We have all been there before - you're running low on space and want to get rid of some apps. Or perhaps you just want to do your device a favor and remove old apps that you no longer use. Sure, the app is gone, but most leave behind unwanted data, taking up precious room on the /data partition, your SD card, or both. Fortunately, XDA member Dark3n has created a app to address such a situation, aptly titled SD Maid.

21
Jul
install

Ever since Apple released its App Store on the (then) iPhone OS 2.0, a special emphasis has been placed on the quantity of apps. As other app markets arrived, the same metric of success carried over. The platform creators used the quantity of applications as a way to convince critics that their platform was popular and thriving and that prospective buyers could take comfort in the platform they were investing money.

04
Nov
image
Last Updated: April 16th, 2010

This post and all its comments were migrated from Artem's personal blog beerpla.net when Android Police launched. If you would like to visit the original post there, please click here.

In this article I will describe the problem I've had with Eclipse's handling of XML file formatting as well as the best way to fix it.

I use Eclipse to do my Android development for a few reasons:

  • it's the only IDE fully supported by the Android dev team
  • it has a visual Layout/Resources builder that transforms XML files into corresponding visual representations
  • it's free and open source
  • I've been using Eclipse for many years and am very familiar with it

In order to use the visual features in Eclipse when developing for Android, you need to install the ADT plugin provided by Google

The Problem

However, one thing about Eclipse Android development has bothered me for a while - and that is XML formatting by the visual tools.