10
Jan
a

OTA updates are usually a good thing, but first impressions can be misleading. The just leaked Android 4.4 KitKat build for the Galaxy S4 seems good, but some behind-the-scenes changes broke SuperSU, making root access difficult. Ever the go-getter, Chainfire already has it sorted out.

The new flashable ZIP file is available from Chainfire's site – version number 1.89. CF-Auto-Root has also been updated to include the new SuperSU. This has been successfully tested with the leaked ROM on the GT-i9505, but should also be fine on other devices you need to get root on.

13
Oct
nexusae0_gnote-3-thumb_thumb

Last week we reported that the AT&T version of the Samsung Galaxy Note 3 had a root method from a couple of enterprising gentlemen over at XDA. The same team-up of designgears and Chainfire has now reproduced the Root De La Vega root method for Verizon's Note 3 (model number SM-N900V), which isn't quite as appropriate as far as the name goes, but it's just as awesome.

E5qGyHm

The same unfortunate conditions apply for the Verizon version of this exploit.

08
Oct
gnote 3 thumb

AT&T might be steadfastly refusing its customers full access to the devices they "own," but it's still plenty possible to get root access on most new phones, especially if they're popular. The Samsung Galaxy Note 3 certainly qualifies for the latter, and the fellas at XDA have come through once again. XDA Recognized Developer "designgears" (with a little help from the reliable Jorrit "Chainfire" Jongma) has released a working root method for AT&T's model of the Note 3 (SM-900A).

07
Oct
a

Samsung was the target of extensive hate recently as it came to light that the Note 3 and other high-end devices would be sporting a new region lock designed to cut back on gray market importers. The company said the lock was only a problem the first time a phone was activated, but some users now claim to be having ongoing issues with foreign SIMs not working. Whether or not Samsung's region lock is working as intended, noted developer Chainfire has released an app that can circumvent the lockdown entirely.

05
Sep
icon

These days, it seems like everybody is trying to make Android more secure. As usual, rooting and modding are often casualties of this effort. Just over a month ago Android 4.3 broke the existing model for root, forcing updates to existing methods, and now Samsung is rolling out updated Android 4.2.2 firmwares for the Galaxy S 4 which fully enable the company's heavily secured KNOX environment. Fortunately, Chainfire is already on top of it and has updated his popular root software, SuperSU, to be compatible with the new system.

31
Jul
icon

Chainfire has been a busy, busy developer. Just a few days ago he released the first working root app for Android 4.3, and now he's sharing an early alpha of his new location tracking project, GeoLog. It's similar to other coordinate logging applications, but takes full advantage of Google's new Fused Location Provider and Activity Recognition APIs (check out Google's demonstration at I/O) to determine how precisely it should be tracking your position, and if it should even be actively logging at all.

25
Jul
image

If you've already updated to Android 4.3, whether via an OTA or by flashing it manually, and rooted it, you're more than likely using Chainfire's SuperSU, which carefully works around the new restrictions Google put in place. Cody has a good write-up about why they did it and what's going on, so go read that if you're interested in the details.

Chainfire created the Android 4.3-compatible root method and the updated SuperSU back when the first leaks showed up for the Galaxy S4 but hasn't updated it for a few weeks.

25
Jul
22Oct2007Winds04
Last Updated: July 29th, 2013

It's no surprise that Google's latest update to our favorite operating system is in instant demand amongst power users and enthusiasts. Without fail, the people eagerly installing 4.3 are frequently the same ones who consider root privileges a necessity for a good Android experience. Unfortunately, it seems a wrench has been thrown into the works when it comes to exposing ultimate access, and people are experiencing more than a few hiccups because of it.

11
Jul
unnamed (1)

Always wanted to use Chainfire's DSLR Controller app, but don't have a Wi-Fi enabled Canon EOS camera? Chainfire's got a solution for you called the "Wi-Fi Stick."

Along with a new Wi-Fi Stick centered app, Chainfire today posted a walkthrough on how to craft the device, which will enable your Canon EOS camera to work with your Android phone or tablet, all by yourself.

For those who are wondering what we're talking about, DSLR Controller is an app that debuted in 2011 as the very first of its kind, allowing users to control their EOS cameras remotely from an Android device.

22
May
nexusae0_whitethumb_thumb2

In case you hadn't heard, Samsung is making a little extra effort to secure the Galaxy S4 via tougher software kernels, which aren't susceptible to some of the more common root methods from previous Galaxy models. But where there's a will, there's a way, and noted Android developer/modder Chainfire has found a way around the security on the stock kernel for the Galaxy S4 i9505 - that's the Qualcomm Snapdragon-powered LTE variant, and the model sold for AT&T and T-Mobile in the United States.

Page 2 of 3123