21
May
Amazon-Icon

The old adage is as true today as it's ever been: good things come to those who wait. Today, Amazon.ca finally granted Canadians access to Amazon Cloud Drive. Our North American siblings can now re-upload all of the photos they've already backed up to iCloud, Dropbox, and Google Drive to Amazon's servers using Cloud Drive Photos for Android and iOS.

Amazon1 Amazon2 Amazon3

Amazon4

Cloud Drive works well for storing music, especially for people who have stocked up on the $5 albums that Amazon rotates each month.

10
Jan
1

Amazon introduced today a new service that gives back to customers who have purchased physical CDs over the last 15 years. Yes, fifteen. It's called AutoRip, and it essentially offers free MP3s of CDs purchased since 1998. If you've been buying music from Amazon for a while, this is absolutely killer. It's worth noting that not all titles are eligible for AutoRip due to licensing restrictions, but Amazon is adding more AutoRip-eligible titles "all the time."

image

Just like with other Amazon music purchases, the AutoRip tracks go straight to your Cloud Player library and don't count against Cloud Storage limits.

31
Jul
unnamed

I make no bones of the fact that Amazon's MP3 service is my favored music playback option on Android, and the service just got a big update to compete with its primary rival - Google Music. The general changelog is here, but it's a little difficult to parse, so I'll give you the gist.

  • Imported file matching to Amazon MP3 library. This is big. Any time you import music into Amazon Cloud Player, before the file is uploaded, Amazon scans the entirety of the eligible Amazon MP3 library and if it finds a match, just adds that file to your Cloud Player library.
06
Jul
image

While Google Music and iTunes sync have upped the game in terms of cloud music storage, we're quick to forget that Amazon had the first service of its kind out on the market (see our review).

In an effort to remain competitive, the online marketplace now announced that you can upgrade your storage to an unlimited amount of MP3s or AACs if you have a 20GB or higher plan. You can then upload as many files as you want to the service, and it won't use up any of your bandwidth.

18
May
thumb2'
Last Updated: July 24th, 2011

When Amazon Cloud Player hit the scene, my exact words were "Google Music who?" and now that Google Music Beta invites are starting to rollout to the masses, I can aptly answer that question.

I've used Amazon Cloud Player as the primary music player on my Android phone since its inception at the end of March, so I've become quite familiar with how it works. The service has its pros and cons (like any service, I suppose), but overall I am a big fan.

06
Apr
1

If you are a fan of the music streaming service Grooveshark, life just got a little worse for you, because as of yesterday, you will no longer find it in the Android Market. While no specifics were mentioned, we know that Google was forced to pull the app due to a violation in the terms of service and possibly some pressure from record labels.

It hasn't been an easy road for Grooveshark since the beginning, as most record labels feel that it promotes piracy by allowing users to upload and share their own tracks.

31
Mar
hi-256-2-e04d1de70af2944c46853a6df7992187d32ee67f

As a direct result of Amazon releasing its (awesome) Cloud Player, music streaming service mSpot has upped its free storage to 5GB. mSpot works almost exactly like Amazon Cloud Player – upload your music, download the app, and stream to your heart's content. Unlike Amazon, however, the most storage that you can get from mSpot is 40GB ($3.99/month) with no plans in between the basic (5GB) and premium (40GB). On the upside, you don't have to shell out the annual fee right away - paying $4/month rather than prepaying for a year could attract some consumers to the service.

29
Mar
GettingStarted_TCG._V184037123_

It’s not much of a secret that Amazon is quickly becoming one of my favorite companies. The way they have embraced Android is wonderful, creating diversity where there used to be none. I recently ran down some of the pros and cons of the Amazon Appstore for Android, which is starting to become my go-to marketplace for new apps. Now they have released a new music streaming service, Cloud Player, which brings some of the functionality that was originally a hope of Google Music to my Droid.

Quantcast