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Android 7.1 Nougat's changelog is here, includes both Pixel-exclusive and non-exclusive changes

Android 7.1 Nougat was unveiled earlier today alongside the Pixel and Pixel XL, but there's still a fair bit we don't know about it. Now, thanks to a source from Google, we've got a list of both Pixel-exclusive and non-exclusive changes. (It's unclear which category the Pixel C falls under.)

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Android 7.1 is coming to current Nexus devices and the Pixel C, will land before the end of 2016 as a dev preview

For those of you who were worried about Google's current Android devices not receiving Android 7.1 Nougat, don't be; Google has confirmed that the Pixel phones' current software version will be arriving on Nexus devices and the Pixel C before the end of the year. However, these devices won't be receiving some Pixel-exclusive (Pixelsclusive?) features.

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Google+ Version 7.1 Gives The Tab Bar Instant Scroll-To-Top Behavior

image: Luke Wroblewski

In case you missed it, the Google+ app for Android got updated recently to version 7.1.

The update is mostly comprised of bug fixes - 37 bug fixes to be exact - but it also offers fixes for 17 "accessibility issues," a fix for the "keep contacts up to date" setting, and one pretty handy feature that makes the bottom tab bar just a little more useful.

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Office Suite Pro Updated To Version 7.1, Brings A Bunch Of Features You May Actually Use

In the cutthroat world of mobile office suites, developers are always trying to bring more features to the table so you'll pick their offering as your go-to. And when it comes to that arena, I personally can't say anyone does it better than Mobile Systems with Office Suite Pro. It's been my personal choice for, well, a long time.

Today the office-on-the-go was updated to version 7.1, which brings with it several new features, including some rather unique options:

What's in this version:

New features in 7.1:
*Oxford Dictionary of English integration (available as a separate add-on product)
*Ability to perform Google search form Word documents
*Insert image from camera (in Word/Excel/PowerPoint)
*Better compatibility with QuickSpell
*Tables resize in Word (separate branches)
*Dual screen support
*Links and Shadows support in PowerPoint
*Image replace in Word
*Improved font formatting and Autofill with cell dragging in Excel
*Improved UI in Excel sheets
*Sheets reordering in Excel

As you can see in the above list, this version has "dual screen support" – whatever that means (seriously, what does that mean?

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Stable Release Of CyanogenMod 7.1 With Support For Android 2.3.7 On 68 Devices Is Finally Out; CyanogenMod 9 Is Up Next

The road to CyanogenMod 7.1, undoubtedly the largest Android custom ROM, now covering a mind-boggling number of devices (68), has been long and rough. We've been hearing rumblings that the final release was almost here for a number of days (just watch the video of the CM sessions from the Big Android BBQ below), but a couple of hours ago it really did seep through and end up at CM download mirrors across the web.

What's New

CM 7.1 adds support for the following (note that not all of these have stable releases out):

  • HTC Desire S, Incredible S, Incredible 2
  • LG Optimus 2X and T-Mobile G2x
  • Motorola Backflip (Motus), Cliq / Cliq XT, Defy, Droid 2, Droid X
  • Samsung Captivate, Fascinate, Mesmerize, Showcase, Vibrant, Galaxy S, Galaxy S2 (multiple carriers)
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia X8, Xperia Mini, Xperia Mini Pro, Xperia Neo, Xperia Play, Xperia Ray, Xperia Arc
  • ZTE V9

More devices are on the horizon as well - EVO 3D, HP Touchpad, Optimus 3D, and others.

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CyanogenMod 7.1 Release Candidate 1 Available Now For Most Supported Devices

The latest version of Android's most popular custom ROM, CyanogenMod, is now available for most of the officially supported Android phones on the CyanogenMod device list.

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CyanogenMod May Soon Allow Users To Revoke Specific Application Permissions, Cue Mass Force Closing As A Result

One of the ways Android protects application users from unwanted activities is by requiring every app to declare a set of permissions and allowing users to view those permissions during the installation phase. Don't like what an app can do? Just don't install it.

However, this all or nothing approach doesn't allow you to selectively turn off specific permissions, so if you don't like that an application accesses your phone state, you can't just disable that and still have the app installed. This forces you to either potentially compromise your privacy or miss out on what could be a great piece of software.

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