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We found 218 results for 'lawsuit'

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AT&T Buys Software Rights And Acquires Some Staff From Carrier iQ (Yes, That Carrier iQ)

Do you remember the huge scandal that was Carrier iQ? It's alright if you don't - it's been over four years since the company's data-logging mobile phone software was revealed, resulting in accusations of privacy violations, lax security, lawsuits both from and against the software maker and its partners, and eventually the removal of Carrier iQ code from phones via security patches. The months-long scandal basically killed Carrier iQ as a company... but now its corporate assets are owned by a carrier jokingly referred to as "the Death Star." There's no way that can go wrong, is there?

Yes, AT&T, in between attempts to snap up competing telcos and the country's biggest satellite TV provider, has somehow found time to buy a tiny but incredibly controversial software developer.

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NVIDIA Tries To Sue Samsung For Patent Infringement, Ends Up Getting Clobbered By Samsung's Patent Sledgehammer

Patent lawsuits are without a doubt one of the more boring topics in technology. It takes a lot of drama to make it interesting, but the case between Samsung (and Qualcomm) and NVIDIA has hit that bar. See, NVIDIA sued Samsung/Qualcomm in late 2014 for infringing three of its patents, but Samsung sued back with three of its own. Now, NVIDIA has lost its case, and Samsung won on all three counts. Burn.

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YouTube Offers To Protect Some Legitimate Fair Use Videos From Frivolous DMCA Claims, Including Possible Court Costs

Editor's note: the first three paragraphs of this story are a brief primer on fair use in US copyright law and the complications created by the DMCA. Skip down if you're already familiar with this stuff.

The United States copyright system has a series of protections for citizens who want to use video, audio, text quotes, and other copyrighted material in legitimate ways. These are generally called fair use exemptions: they're why Saturday Night Live can make a parody of Jeopardy or The Big Bang Theory without the fear of CBS suing them for copyright infringement, or why a movie reviewer can use clips of the movie in his video critique.

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Deutsche Telekom And T-Mobile Force Another Company To Change Its Logo Because It Was Too Magentastic

Oxy is a small start-up company out of the United Kingdom that is planning to launch a new smartwatch on Indiegogo this month. By all accounts, it is not competing with any other company in the industry, not even Pebble. But Oxy got served with a lil' lawsuit threat when it tried to file for a trademark on its logo (shown on the left in the image above) by Deutsche Telekom. Reasons? Magenta. I feel like we've been down this road before.

The last time that T-Mobile and Deutsche Telekom were up in arms about their Magentastic Property(TM), the offender was an AT&T subsidiary, Aio Wireless.

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[Update: Chinese Original Found] Company Slaps Commodore Brand On Back Of Generic Smartphone, Gets Attention

This morning, a story on Wired was published, and it might have you believe some sort of zombie Commodore is building a Commodore-inspired smartphone called the PET, which sounds kind of cool (I guess?).

Well, here's the thing: I'm not going to say Wired got duped - but they also seem to have missed some pretty glaring red flags about this device that should probably make anyone think twice before getting excited.

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The FCC Plans To Fine AT&T Mobility $100 Million For Misleading 'Unlimited' Data Plans

It's been almost eight months since the Federal Communications Commission opened its lawsuit against AT&T for misleading statements on its "unlimited" data plans. Today the Commission announced its intention (PDF link) to fine the wireless company $100 million for failing to notify its customers that going over unspecified data limits on an "unlimited" plan would result in severely reduced or "throttled" speed, well below advertised speeds, violating the 2010 Open Internet Transparency Rule. "Unlimited means Unlimited," said FCC Enforcement Bureau Chief Travis LeBlanc.

The Federal Communications Commission plans to fine AT&T Mobility, LLC $100,000,000 for misleading its customers about unlimited mobile data plans.

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Edge Of Oblivion: Alpha Squadron 2 Is Basically Rogue Squadron Without Star Wars, Yours For $5

Remember Rogue Squadron? Nintendo 64 and Gamecube owners, past or present, know what I'm talking about. This series of Star Wars games had players fully immersed in intergalactic battles that were stunning for the time. Alongside Star Fox, Nintendo consoles were the place to be for top-notch space shooters.

Edge of Oblivion: Alpha Squadron 2, the sequel to—you guessed it—Alpha Squadron, again unapologetically hearkens back to that era. Ship designs are similar enough to tempt a lawsuit, and the opening stage may have you feeling like you're speeding through the skies of Hoth (on one of its clearer days). The game contains two story-driven campaigns containing over 80 missions altogether, which involve blasting ships out of the sky and destroying key land-based targets.

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Motorola Ordered To Pay Fujifilm $10 Million For Camera Patent Infringement

If corporate patent litigation was a soap opera, it would be at once the most interesting and most snooze-inducing show on television. The latest twist comes from a three-year-old suit by Fujifilm against Motorola Mobility, which was still a Google company instead of a Lenovo one when the suit first started. Fuji alleged that Moto violated three camera patents and one wireless patent in its phones without licensing. A San Francisco court invalidated Fuji's claims on all but one of them, so Moto will have to pay for the privilege of one camera patent.

That corporate faux pas will cost Motorola (and by extension, Lenovo) $10.2 million USD, according to a report by Reuters.

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Google Wants To Buy Your Patents To Keep Them Away From Patent Trolls

The world of technology patents is in bad shape. When John Oliver decides that he needs to spend 15 minutes explaining exactly how bad patent trolling has become, you know something rots in the USPTO. Google is trying to stem the tide of patent trolling and litigation via the simple expedient of throwing a ton of cash at the problem. They want to buy your patents.

Well, maybe not your patent in particular - odds are pretty good that they're only interested in technology and software patents, and even then, only so that some fly-by-night LLC with a dozen lawyers and no physical address won't sue them in the future.

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