David Ruddock
David's phone is an HTC One. He is an avid writer, and enjoys playing devil's advocate in editorials, imparting a legal perspective on tech news, and reviewing the latest phones and gadgets. He also doesn't usually write such boring sentences.

02
Sep
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Welcome to the Android Police Week In Review - your source for the biggest Android stories of the week. Don't forget, you can catch a lot of these stories (and more) on our weekly podcast.

Features

Hardware Reviews

Rumor Roundup

  • Some pictures of an HTC iMac tablet have popped up and oh god, HTC, please don't.

01
Sep
Samsung-Galaxy-S-III-UK-preorder

Have you heard?! Apple now says the Galaxy S III is infringing on its patents. Woe is us!

Except, this is a.) completely unsurprising, and b.) not really important in the grand scheme of things. Yesterday, Reuters reported that Apple had tacked on the Galaxy S III (including the Verizon version specifically, for whatever reason), the Note 10.1, and the original Galaxy Note to its upcoming California lawsuit against Samsung. And yes, they'll probably add the Galaxy Note II just as soon as Samsung gets around to releasing it here in the US.

31
Aug
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It's time again for the Android Police Podcast. It's also time for the Android Police Podcast every Thursday at 5PM PST - where you can hear us with various screw-ups and profanities included (www.androidpolice.com/podcast). This week, we're talking Apple v. Samsung and IFA 2012.

Subscribe to the Android Police Podcast:

The Cast

  • Matthew Smith, Host
  • Bob Severns, A/V, Editor, button-presser
  • David Ruddock, Co-host
  • Cameron Summerson, Co-host
  • Eric Ravenscraft, Co-host

THE OUTLINE

Rumor Roundup

  • Some pictures of an HTC iMac tablet have popped up and oh god, HTC, please don't.
29
Aug
note2b

PocketNow has gotten its hands on what very much look like some leaked press images (and specification details) of the Galaxy Note II, which is expected to be announced in just about an hour. First, to the pictures:

note2b note2c

The specifications have basically lined up with a lot of what has been rumored already, including:

  • 1.6GHz quad-core processor (probably a clocked-up Exynos 4412 from the Galaxy S III)
  • 2GB RAM
  • 5.5" Super AMOLED panel (1280x720 - true 16:9 compared to the original Note's 1280x800)
  • 3100mAh battery
  • 9.4mm thick
  • 16/32/64GB configurations
  • HSPA+ and LTE (depending on model - we'd put our money on a Snapdragon S4 version with LTE for the US)
  • Blue and white colors at launch (same as GSIII)
  • Android 4.1
  • 8MP rear / 1.9MP front cameras

PocketNow also discusses some of the new features of the Note II, including the improved S-Pen.

28
Aug
Isis_TM_logo_w_stars_black_rgb

MasterCard and T-Mobile revealed some information about which devices we can expect Isis on when it launches at the end of September (according to Bloomberg), though we have no reason to believe this constitutes every supported device. Here's the list of compatible Android phones, as we've compiled it.

  • T-Mobile
    • Galaxy S II
    • Galaxy S III
    • HTC Amaze 4
  • Verizon
    • DROID Incredible 4G LTE
    • Galaxy S III
  • AT&T
    • One X
    • Galaxy S III

A number of other devices are listed as supporting "any" standard on MasterCard's list, some being international phones, so it's unclear whether phones labeled in this fashion that are in the US will actually support Isis, or if they are merely deemed compatible with it.

28
Aug
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According to the Wall Street Journal, Samsung isn't wasting time on keeping the eight smartphones Apple is demanding injunctions against on store shelves. And no, I'm not talking about an appeal.

Samsung is currently working with the carriers selling at least five of those phones in order to strip them of the features described in the software patents they were deemed to infringe as part of Friday's verdict in Apple v.

28
Aug
TMOBILE_samsunggalaxys2android4.0updateipv6126

A rather innocuous OTA update (T989UVLH1) for T-Mobile's Galaxy S II was announced today, with a 2-line changelog that, on the surface, probably won't excite anyone:

Improvements

  • ISIS/NFC update
  • Bug fixes

That's the whole thing. But that little Isis mention is easy to overlook - this is the first phone to officially indicate (if indirectly) support for the carrier-backed mobile payment system. Unfortunately, we don't have a T-Mobile Galaxy S II in order to check if this update actually brings the Isis app itself, or is merely in preparation for support.

27
Aug
Spider_Front_1, 8/11/11, 11:29 AM,  8C, 4274x2400 (768+2896), 100%, Bent 6 Adjuste,  1/20 s, R42.8, G30.0, B59.6<br />

According to P3droid, a number of Motorola devices running Android 4.0+ have been imbued with a new feature you might not have noticed: a visual root checker. It's present on the RAZR, RAZR MAXX, DROID 4, and test builds of the Bionic. It operates rather simply. Once a phone is rooted, somewhere in permanent memory, a status change is written that displays in the phone's recovery menu.

26
Aug
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Wireless headphones are a rapidly emerging market, thanks to the continually growing proportion of the population that own Bluetooth-enabled smartphones and tablets. On-ear wireless headphones, in particular, are picking up. We've reviewed several of these style of headphones, and found performance and price to vary wildly. You can spend $30 on a bargain-bin set of wireless headphones, or upwards of $400-500 for some of the name brand audiophile products out there.

26
Aug
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It's time again for another edition of the Android Police Week In Review. This week, there's all sorts of crazy law stuff and Note 10.1 things going on, so be sure to check out the Android At Arms and Product Review sections! You can also hear us talk about most of these topics on our weekly podcast.

Carrier 411

  • T-Mobile unveils its new unlimited data plan that's really unlimited, as opposed to the old unlimited data plans that really weren't unlimited, but are still called unlimited.