Android Police

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Google's Play Protect didn't catch obfuscated malware with up to 20 million installs on the Play Store

At this year's I/O, Google announced Play Protect, a user-facing security screening process for apps on Android phones based on the old Verify Apps. Basically, it scans apps you install, comparing their content against known malware components, and notifies you if any potential risks are found. And it turns out, it's not infallible, as an older "packed" malware package was able to trick it. 

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Chrome Beta 60 adds new search widget, limits the Vibration API to combat malware ads, and more [APK Download]

Chrome 59 was just released, which means Chrome 60 has graduated to beta status. This version includes a few interface changes, like a new context menu and file picker, as well as a new search widget. The Vibration API also has some new limitations to combat malware ads. Let's take a look.

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Security firm Check Point says millions infected with botnet malware via Play Store

The conventional wisdom is that limiting your app downloads to the Play Store will help you avoid malware. That's true for the most part, but every now and then we hear about something sketchy that fell through the cracks. For instance, the security firm Check Point says that a number of "game guide" apps in the Play Store were hiding malicious code, and they may have accumulated millions of downloads.

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Google and Lookout detail super-sophisticated 'Chrysaor' Android malware

An unusually advanced strain of malware was discovered on iOS last year, dubbed Pegasus by Lookout and other security firms that analyzed it. Now, an Android version of Pegasus has been discovered. The new malware is known as Chrysaor, and a full analysis of its origins and capabilities has been published by Google and Lookout. It's a serious piece of malware, but you don't have to worry about it showing up on your phone.

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Google had to disable 900,000 ads in 2016 for spreading malware, and that's just the tip of the bad ad iceberg

Spend any amount of time on the internet (without an ad-blocker) and you'll run across at least a few Google AdSense ads. They're everywhere—including on AP. Being such a huge ad platform, it's also utilized by scammers, malware creators, and other internet ne'er-do-wells. Google has a new blog post up detailing what it did in 2016 to limit the use of AdSense for scams and illegal activity. The most relevant statistic for us is 900,000 ads disabled for spreading malware. That's a lot of malware.

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[So Smart] This man's smart television with Google TV caught some malware, and now it's bricked

You know what's great? Having lots of streaming content available on your TV. What's not so great is when your quest to stream content results in ransomware bricking your TV. One fellow on Twitter shared the story of an LG TV that caught some nasty malware, and now it's apparently useless. Perhaps technology has gone too far.

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The Gooligan Android malware has infected more than 1 million devices since August

The battle against Android malware is ongoing, but it's a big world and Android is everywhere. It presents a tempting target for criminals, and the Gooligan malware is just the latest attempt to make a buck off the trusting nature of smartphone users. This attack has compromised more than a million phones in the last few months, and as many as 13,000 new infections are occurring each day. The goal is not to steal your data (although that can still happen), but to make you download apps in an advertising fraud scheme.

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The Developer Accused Of Creating Powerful Malware Known As "Dendroid" Now Admits It, Faces Potential Prison Sentence

Over a year ago there was a lot of concern about this piece of malware that had not only a flashy, user-friendly interface, but also the ability to monitor audio and video on Android devices. Even worse, it was able to slip past the automated checking used by Google at the time. Technically, it was really a software toolkit to make it easier to package malware APKs and then do malicious things with them.

At long last, Morgan Culbertson was arrested last month after being charged with creating the software. Tuesday, Culbertson pleaded guilty in federal court, telling the judge "I committed the crime" when asked why he was entering the plea.

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Firefox Stable Release Is Updated To v40 With Tweaked Forward/Back Navigation, Better Malware Protection, And Other Minor Improvements

Keeping to their normal rapid release schedule, Mozilla published v40 of the stable release of Firefox to the Play Store today. The biggest user-facing change in the update is one that was also present in the beta version of v40, allowing you to long press the forward or back buttons to see a list of your recently visited pages. Here's a quick look at how that works:

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This is the sort of thing that only catches your attention when there aren't any other major changes, but this is one of those times. I don't think mobile browsers generally make going back very easy and sometimes the system back button isn't ideal when you plan to go back multiple pages.

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Author Of Surprisingly Well-Marketed Android Malware "Dendroid" Arrested In Multi-National Cybercrime Raid

Last year, there was a rather widely-covered story about a piece of Android malware (rather, an Android malware control suite) called Dendroid. That malware was published for sale on a cybercrime-aligned forum known as Darkode, and it just so happens that the FBI (with assistance from agencies in other nations) just arrested the guy who wrote Dendroid as part of a larger raid on Darkode's operators.

That guy is Morgan C. Culbertson, who has a pretty solid real name, but somehow the most tragically boring and uninventive criminal alias of all time: "Android." Come on, Morgan - you could have done better.

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