27
Aug
pinky

Remember when T-Mobile announced plans that included Music Freedom, which let users stream music from certain services without impacting their wireless data limits? Remember when it didn't include [insert your music streaming service of choice here], so you ignored it? Actually that isn't quite fair: Music Freedom support currently includes Pandora, Spotify, and iHeartRadio, which are the heavy hitters in the industry. But it's hard to deny that a lack of support for Google Play Music was kind of disheartening.

Good news, everyone: T-Mobile says that after a user poll indicated that everyone wanted Google Play Music added to the free streaming list, they're going to implement it. Not now. Sometime in the future. Probably before the end of the year, according to this promotional post. Hooray! The free streaming option will hopefully apply both to Google Play Music Unlimited subscribers and free users who have personal music stored on Google Play servers.

original

Thanks, Matthew.

In the meantime, T-Mo is adding six new music services to Music Freedom streaming: Grooveshark, Rdio, Songza, Black Planet, AccuRadio, and Radio Paradise. That brings the list of supported services up to 14, including iTunes and Milk, which are only available on Apple and Samsung devices, respectively. That could be a serious draw for users who want to stream a ton of music without spending the extra money for T-Mobile's unlimited LTE plan.

Source: T-Mobile

BELLEVUE, Washington – August 27, 2014 – T-Mobile today announced the first major expansion to its Music Freedom™  program − doubling the number of music streaming services you’ll be able to use with its landmark music streaming offer. Starting today, six new music streaming services – AccuRadio, Black Planet, Grooveshark, Radio Paradise, Rdio and Songza – are all available as part of T-Mobile’s Music Freedom, so Simple Choice customers can stream all the music they want from these services – all on T-Mobile’s Data Strong™  network and all without ever hitting their LTE data bucket.
In addition, T-Mobile announced the winner of its social voting poll, designed in true Un-carrier™  fashion to let customers decide which services they wanted to add next.  After nearly three-quarters of a million people voted, Google Play Music topped the charts as the most requested service.  T-Mobile is on track to add Google Play Music to the Music Freedom program later this year.
“When the big ‘carriers’ look at music, they see an opportunity to use someone’s passion to make a buck.  When the Un-carrier looks at music, we see an opportunity to set customers free from the tolls and limitations those carriers impose,” said John Legere, president and CEO of T-Mobile. “Our goal is nothing less than to set all your music free, and we’re well on our way.”
Just two months ago, in June, T-Mobile shook up both the mobile and music industries with Un-carrier 6.0—a move that took a wrecking ball to the restrictions some traditional carriers place on music streaming with their data limits and overage fees.
And if early results are any indicator, it’s clear T-Mobile customers are embracing their newfound music freedom with gusto. In fact, to date customers have streamed nearly seven thousand terabytes of music since the launch and are streaming 5 million more songs per day than before the launch of Music Freedom.
“T-Mobile’s Music Freedom and services like Grooveshark are about bringing music accessibility to the consumer,” said Sam Tarantino, Co-founder and CEO of Grooveshark, “Together with Music Freedom, Grooveshark is creating a new kind of music discovery on T-Mobile devices. We believe the combined global audiences of millions represents a new and engaged audience for Grooveshark on T-Mobile.”
The new services join iHeartRadio, iTunesRadio, Pandora, Rhapsody, Samsung Milk, Slacker and Spotify already included in Music Freedom. T-Mobile has a vision to add every possible music streaming service to Music Freedom, and any music streaming provider can be part of Music Freedom by applying through T-Mobile’s open submission process. To learn more about Music Freedom, please visit t-mobile.com/musicfreedom.
Qualifying Simple Choice plan and capable device required.  Music streaming does not count towards data allotment on T-Mobile’s network; song downloads, video content, and non-audio content excluded. Data rates apply to Smartphone Mobile HotSpot service and tethered devices.  For included services, see list at http://www.t-mobile.com/offer/free-music-streaming.html.

Michael Crider
Michael is a native Texan and a former graphic designer. He's been covering technology in general and Android in particular since 2011. His interests include folk music, football, science fiction, and salsa verde, in no particular order.

  • andy_o

    YEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

    • andy_o

      EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS!!!!!!

  • CUEBALL

    Can't wait for a new Nexus to come out so I can dump Verizon and go to T-Mobile

    • http://www.thepixelpuse.com/ Aj Meadows

      I did the same thing last year. Best. Decision. Ever.

      • CUEBALL

        Only thing stopping me is the phone. I don't want to get a Nexus 5 when a new one should be around the corner... I hope.

        • Joe Menard

          I just added the Jump program since the new 4 lines for $100 a month is ending soon. Once half of the device is paid off I am allowed to turn in my nexus 5 and upgrade to a new phone.. Which will be the new nexus :) its only $10 extra a month and it includes jump as well as the insurance on the phone! Its crazy that 4 lines and 2 new phones is still less on T-Mobile than 2 lines on att

        • Pootis Man

          Yeah it's better if you do wait. The Moto X+1 is coming out September 4 and the Nexus X is rumored to launch in October. Really excited for the next Nexus phone!

          • Ryan

            Its only being announced officially, not necessarily a release.

          • Pootis Man

            Well you never know.

          • drzfr3shboialex

            They announced and released the Nexus 5 the same day last year, always a possibility.

          • Fatal1ty_93_RUS

            "Nexus X"
            Dude, WTF, stop following TK Tech News

          • Pootis Man

            Um....... I got that from Phone arena not whatever tk tech is and why don't you particularly like that site?

          • dude

            Add BGR to that list.

          • Pootis Man

            You could also add technobuffalo to list as well.

      • Open1Your1Eyes0

        Until T-Mobile can match even half the coverage of Verizon I am holding onto my unlimited data plan with them till they take from my cold dead hands.

        • Bob G

          Which will be soon.

          • https://twitter.com/#!/psychomaniac189 psychomaniac189

            hope so. i hate roaming!

        • tekfr33kn

          VZW is planning on getting rid of your grandfathered unlimited plan later this year weather you like it or not. (http://www.androidcentral.com/verizon-may-be-about-close-loophole-its-remaining-unlimited-data-users) That's why I dumped them. I had 2 smartphones and a flip phone for my kid on VZW. I now have 3 smartphones on T-Mo and still pay less. I still have unlimited data on my N5 too.

        • GazaIan

          Yeah, there was an announcement a while back saying that Verizon will pretty much stop honoring grandfathered unlimited plans. Surely wish T-Mo had better coverage around you, the service is fucking amazing where I'm at.

          • Aaron C

            I'd still be on Verizon if I lived in one of those areas as well. But Long Island is saturated with T-Mo LTE. I hope the Nexus X has a 700Mhz radio so when T-Mo rolls out the spectrum, I'll have better coverage when traveling to northern New England. This summer's vacation was brutal. Try using Waze when you're on Edge or roaming.

      • Aaron C

        Yep. Can't beat T-Mo. I was with Verizon for 12 years. Now we have two Nexus 4's, two Moto G's and an HTC Sensation and we're spending ~$120 a month for five lines with 2.5GB each. Three lines on Verizon were $230 a month including corporate discount. Once Google Play Music is added, I'll probably be down to around 1.5GB a month usage. Yay!

    • David Monostori

      I'm gonna do the same :)

  • Orsteezy

    First time hearing about this.. Wondering if AT&WTF would ever do something like this??

    • Gregor Smith

      They did announce they'd be open to "sponsored data" awhile back, no reason why this couldn't fall under that... I get 2.5gb and it ain't enough to stream music as much as I listen via SD card

      • andy_o

        That is different though, T-mobile is not getting paid by the music services for this privilege, which IMO it's a key difference. This takes out the advantage of the bigger players to smother the competition.

        • Grayson

          It still gives T-Mo far too much control over which internet services you use though. I don't want my and everyone elses internet habits influenced by which services internet services providers decide we should have unlimited access to.

          • CoolCustomer

            Edit: I apologize Grayson I meant to reply to one of the angry blokes above, not sure how it ended up down here.

            Unfortunately, there is no way for Tmo to implement this for users without a handful complaining that it violates net neutrality or unjustly forces users towards a handful of services. Even if they make any and all music not count against data limits you could still make the argument that a person who prefers to listen to music on youtube because of certain niche songs not being available anywhere else is being discriminated against because they way they choose to listen to music is not supported.

            Personally, while it may violate the "spirit" of net neutrality I do not believe it is functionally a problem because of: A) Transparancy - Tmo makes it clear what they get out of the deal (nothing) and what a service needs to do to be included, B) It's Free - Tmo receives no money for this transaction, in fact one could argue they loose money by taking away the incentive for music lovers on lower plans to upgrade.

            It is my firm believe that anyone complaining about the violations of net neutrality in this particular case fall squarely in the "doth pretest too much" category. This is great for Tmo and great for their customers and if your preferred fly-by-night (or just not as popular) music streaming service doesn't have a large enough user base on Tmo to get voted in then you should either get a new carrier, switch services, or continue doing what you are already doing which is stream your music with the data counting against your "high-speed" limit.

          • pfmiller

            I agree. I'd be happier if they just gave everyone an extra gig of free data instead of unlimited music.

  • http://turbofool.com Jarrett Lennon Kaufman

    Doesn't impact me since I pay for unlimited, but my girlfriend's been listening to more and more music and hit her limit for the first time ever last month. So she's eagerly awaiting Play Music's addition to this. Glad T-Mobile's finally acknowledging the plan, at least.

  • Brad

    So having never used any of these (for the most part)... which should I use? I'm sick of spotify and pandora's skip limits, mostly.

    • andy_o

      I don't think there are any without skip limits and ads, while being free.

    • dark_funk

      I've been pretty happy with Google Music. You can use it for free with your own music, and it's the usual $10/mo for unlimited. Most people who use Spotify Premium seem happy with it, too, so you might want to look into that.

      I don't know of any services that are less than $10/mo which don't throw ads or restrictions into the service, though Spotify has a $5/mo deal for students.

      • Brad

        well, no, i used to use it... i mean of the ones included in streaming.

        • dark_funk

          Spotify is included in streaming, and Google Music soon will be. In terms of the ones they added today, way back in the day I used to use Grooveshark. They went through a rough patch with legality, but they seem to be doing things proper again. You might want to check them out. They're actually a bit cheaper, as well.

  • sihlkee

    Lack of support for Google Play Music was disheartening? No. What's disheartening is seeing so many people excited for data favoritism as opposed to net neutrality.

    • Brad

      The announcement gives everyone the ability to apply to have their app included.

      • sihlkee

        Are you trying to claim this data favoritism falls in line with net neutrality? Not even close.

      • Grayson

        Yes, because a future where every website and service has to apply to every internet service provider in the world to allow users to get their content sounds great!

        • Brad

          it's not banned from access and these companies or apps aren't paying for the ability to be included. It's basically the same thing as a visacard giving you cash back on gasoline...

    • EH101

      So you want pure net neutrality, where 5 GB of music streaming would put you at or over your limit? (in most cases) VS this where that 5GB doesn't count against you and you still have 5GB to do whatever?

      Seriously, your argument is flawed. Now, if they said "hey, we're going to throttle everyone except for Pandora streamers" you'd have a pretty good case. But that's not even close to what this is. This is giving you something extra (for no reason and/or cost), instead of limiting something for no reason.

      • https://play.google.com/store/apps/developer?id=iWizard Bikram Agarwal

        I had argued for a long time in 2 separate threads on reddit last time arond when music freedom was announced. "Net Neutrality warriors" didn't see the logic.

        • EH101

          Yeah, I know it's a pretty futile argument to take up, and that likely makes me an idiot for doing so, but it needs to be said every time there is a comment thread where this pops up. The casual reader/lurker might understand the point. I stress the word 'might.'

        • DrakeTungsten

          That's because Net Neutrality has nothing to do with logic. It's usually championed by people who have no clue how the internet actually works, (and often cannot even agree on what Net Neutrality actually is), as they clearly have no clue as to how harmful this policy would actually be to the Internet.

          "Net neutrality (also network neutrality or Internet neutrality) is the principle that Internet service providers and governments should treat all data on the Internet equally, not discriminating or charging differentially by user, content, site, platform, application, type of attached equipment, and modes of communication."

          Never mind how impractical it would be to implement, let alone enforce.

      • Grayson

        Yes, I want pure net neutrality. If we allow this, then it sets us up to be screwed later when T-Mo reduces the general data limit of every plan to something like 100 MB, pretty much forcing people to use the services that they have pre-approved and decided to let you have unlimited access to.

        • EH101

          That's so ridiculously unlikely to happen that the argument is actually bordering on being funny and sad simultaneously. I would be inclined to take this concern seriously if there were a definitive monopoly or duopoly where this scenario would be relatively easy to pull off, but we don't have that in this country at this time or any time in the foreseeable future. Perhaps, you should learn to be less cynical.

          • http://www.facebook.com/lucyparanormal Daniel Tiberius

            For real, Verizon would do something like that, but not T-Mobile considering their position right now.

          • EH101

            I could definitely see Verizon doing this, and probably AT&T also. But, with Sprint (gross) and T-Mobile keeping things in check these days, I find it unlikely.

          • Grayson

            Right now T-Mo wouldn't, but no one, even the CEO of T-Mo, can say what they will or won't do 10 years from now. We don't know what the market will look like then. I'd rather them not even have the ability to f us over. I don't want to leave it to chance and just keep saying "nah, I doubt that would ever happen" right up until the point that it happens.

          • AuroraFlux

            10 years ago we didn't have the "smartphone" as we know it today.

            I'd rather not waste time reveling in the paranoia of doomsday theories by someone who's concerned about what might happen ten years from now.

            10 years from now, we might not have telcos. 10 years from now, Android might be dead. 10 years from now, the sun might just up and explode.

            Right now, this deal is good for the consumer and there is no argument to the contrary.

          • sihlkee

            This is a good deal for people just like this is:

            http://www.wordstream.com/images/what-is-net-neutrality-isp-package-diagram.jpg

            The effect is the same. Either that's good for people or Net Neutrality is good for people -- can't have it both ways on this.

          • AuroraFlux

            No, it's not as binary as you make it out to be and that picture is not remotely related to this at all.

            Keep reaching. It's pathetic.

          • sihlkee

            Music Freedom is very analogous to that picture. T-Mobile is deciding which services get preferential treatment on its network. That unquestionably goes against the principle of net neutrality, and so it is binary - you either think net neutrality is a good thing and should be enforced, or you don't and would rather have ISPs decide which sites, apps, and services get that advantage.

          • AuroraFlux

            No, again, you're trying to see it in black and white when it's not. You really need to stop doing this whole "you either x or you z", because it just doesn't work here.

            The music companies are not paying a dime for this and there is no agreement between T-Mobile and any of them to do this (if you can point to otherwise, please tell me).

            Second, the actual quality/speed of streaming is not getting raised or lowered in any way based on what plan you choose. Streaming music is effectively free on all of T-Mobile's post-paid plans, in the same way that once upon a time, in-network calling used to be effectively free on all xyz carrier's plans.

            This is nothing like Verizon v. Netflix. T-Mobile is not an ISP and should not be treated as such (although this concept is difficult to understand by many people). They are a mobile communications service provider.

            There is no "advantage" here, especially since T-Mobile DID NOT DECIDE which service is free. They looked at the usage metrics, and they asked their consumers for a vote. Their consumers made this decision with their wallets, whether or not they were with T-Mobile to begin with. Verizon never asked its customers if they wanted Netflix to work smoothly, and that is something you should be outraged about. Not this. This is just a waste of time.

            Are you also outraged that T-Mobile doesn't want you to torrent on your phone? Torrents are part of the internet. What about child pornography? That's part of the internet. What about gambling and illicit drug trade? That's part of the internet. Is T-Mobile violating net neutrality by prohibiting your access to that? Do you see how idiotic your binary vision is?

            You can use all the politically passionate and heated words and phrases that you want, but this isn't the right venue for your thoughts.

          • sihlkee

            You could save yourself a lot of trouble and just say yes, you don't support net neutrality enforcement for mobile internet providers. You support walled gardens set up through capped data zero-rating schemes like this.

            I'm right about this. The EFF is right about this. And you could just honestly say you don't support net neutrality for mobile ISPs instead of acting all indignant when I suggest you don't.

          • Aaron C

            So you're saying Music Freedom today is going to lead to effing us over ten years from now? Um, I'll take my chances. FREE ALL THE MUSICS!!!

          • Grayson

            Really? You trust carriers to do the right thing just because it would be douchey not to? I think a little more cynicism would do you some good. With only 4 major carriers here, it's easy for them to all do the same thing. There doesn't need to be a monopoly for this to happen. Remember when none of the US carriers had any data limits? And then bam, all of them did one day? Yup, I didn't think so.

          • EH101

            Yes, I do remember. And I also remember small groups of people ruining that for us by going over 20GB per month, every month.

            And you are conveniently forgetting there are 4 major carriers who, thus far, agree on almost nothing at all and that we have a (somewhat weak) governing body to keep watch. Simply put, the odds of the scenario you are suggesting to play out are astronomically low.

            Anyhow, I believe we've both made our points clear and I must be getting back to work.

            Good conversation, in the sense that no one resorted to name calling.

        • Aaron C

          Then you're free to move to another carrier that *doesn't* do that. It's a good reason why the Fed wants four carriers for the moment. All indications are that T-Mobile keeps making decisions that add value to the consumer. Why would they then turn around and do things that pi$$ them off? Doesn't make any sense.

      • h4rr4r

        Yes, I do.
        This will lead to consumers selecting the provider who is bundled with their service to protect the 5GB they pay for. This means ISPs will be picking winners and they will charge for that service. You are not thinking more than 3 seconds into the future.

        • EH101

          Refer to comment to Grayson.

    • derp hurr-durr

      How is this "data favoritism"?

      Until the cap is reached, no data is throttled or given preferential treatment. Once the cap is reached, minus streaming, *all* data is throttled; again - nothing is given preferential treatment.

      Net Neutrality: All data treated Equally.

      Are they throttling any data prior to the cap being reached? Nope.
      Are they allowing any data to bypass the throttling once the cap is reached? Nope.

      So....problem?

  • Daniel Marcus

    I think there are a couple of important things to note. First, is that not counting data for these services towards your account's high speed limit is not favoring their packets. T-Mo isn't saying that these music providers get priority, just that they don't count against the limit you pay for. Second is that judging by some of the smaller names, they're open to the inclusion of services that reach out to them. This is actually great! It means that smaller or upcoming services can use this as a way to compete with the big guys.

    • sihlkee

      Making data for certain services free while charging for others' is not favoring packets how exactly?

      • Daniel Marcus

        Favoring packets is a very specific practice. It indicates that given two packets travelling the line at approximately the same time, packets from one provider will be put through out-of-order from the queue while lower priority packets are held up. It would mean, for example, that if YouTube were favored over Vimeo, streaming a YT video when you are at your speed limit could actually block most or all of the Vimeo feed. Fair treatment of packets would mean both would operate within about half of your bandwidth, assuming both companies are able to supply video at that rate. In other words, if I'm streaming from a service not on the list, they aren't going to slow the packets artificially behind the services on the list.

        • mgamerz

          That doesn't really work. Imagine if Youtube had unlimited data vs Vimeo having count against the data limit. Who do you think is going to get more use (if data caps are a concern to the user).

          At some point T-Mobile is going to have to start not allowing people in or all the big data eaters will be free.

          • Daniel Marcus

            Well, then Vimeo should apply at the link they provided. Unfortunately, though, data caps in one form or another on mobile networks is essentially industry standard. Net Neutrality is not about limits, it's about packet treatment and priority *prior* to the limit.

          • sihlkee

            Sign up with T-Mobile and listen to all the Pandora you want, watch all the Youtube you want... is exactly the kind of thing enforcing Net Neutrality was meant to stop. You're just wrong.

          • Grayson

            @sihlkee:disqus I think they'll be singing a different tune one day when T-Mo and other carriers implement the next phase of the plan... reducing general data limits to super low levels (think 100 MB) so that the services that they provide unlimited access to are really the only option. Only then will they realize that it was a mistake to let this slide and get in bed with the carrier that began the end of the free web as we know it.

          • Brad

            alarmist.

          • Brad

            nobody said anything about youtube being included.

          • tekfr33kn

            Dan, it's become painfully obvious that @sihlkee:disqus doesn't really understand what net neutrality means or how it works. His misinformation has got him wound up over something that isn't even true. You keep explaining it and he keeps burying his head in the sand. Keep up the good fight though. You're on the right track.

          • Grayson

            Actually YOU don't understand @tekfr33kn:disqus and @disqus_Ob0UCo8NnU:disqus . @sihlkee:disqus is right. What if T-Mo decides to reduce the data limit of every plan to 100 MB / month, keeping this program in place. In that scenario, the general data limit is so low that you'll essentially only be able to use the services and websites that T-Mo has chosen to allow you unlimited access to. I don't know about you, but I don't like a future where internet service providers could choose which web services and content I can use / view. Apparently you do? That is EXACTLY what the idea of net neutrality is designed to prevent. Yes, the general data limits are multiple GBs currently so it isn't an issue yet, but what about in the future? Slippery slope. By your logic, if they reduce the data limits to 100 MB / month for every plan, excluding the services they allow unlimited access to, that would be perfectly fine. I can see it now... each carrier will have a list of services / sites they allow unlimited access to and will have very low caps for everything else, so essentially you'll be choosing which internet sites you want access to when you choose a carrier. Goodbye free internet.

          • tekfr33kn

            Ooo...Ow! That hurt... I would absolutely agree with you if any of it were true but you have as much failed logic as @sihlkee:disqus .

            "What if T-Mo decides to reduce the data limit of every plan to 100 MB / month" - Funny but they just gave an extra Gig to each customer with no change in plan fees. Do you honestly think that a company as competitive as T-Mo would do something that stupid and still expect to stay in business? They still have competition and are using it to their advantage.

            "I don't like a future where internet service providers could choose which web services and content I can use / view" - T-Mo isn't choosing services or limiting any of it. You have the data you paid for and can use what ever service you want at whatever speed is available in your area. Nothing has changed. The Music Freedom allows any and all of the music services to apply and go across the same cell towers without changing anything additional against the data you still have.

            There is no throttling. There is no limiting. This precisely what Net Neutrality is about. You have this delusion of everything being free and fast at all times regardless of the resources it takes to make it happen. I find it amazing that T-Mo keeps adding to the customer's plans without changing the fees and the other carriers keep taking away, yet somehow you are pissed off about this and feel that you are being "reduced". How backwards and uninformed can you really be?

          • Grayson

            Dude, you're completely failing to think about the future. I know T-Mo isn't going to reduce data limits like that now, but what about 5 years from now? 10? Companies like this can change in a heartbeat and we are setting ourselves up to be screwed in the future. There is absolutely nothing stopping my scenario from playing out on every US carrier. Remember when there was no such thing as a data limit in the US? And then, out of nowhere, every carrier in the US had data limits?

          • Brad

            tl;dr "Actually YOU don't understand tekfr33kn and Daniel Marcus .sihlkee is right. What if T-Mo decides to reduce the data limit of every plan to 100 MB / month, keeping this program in place." Then we'll all leave... we're not bound by contract. This is a perk of their service. If everything blows except I can stream pandora... see ya later.

          • h4rr4r

            You think that application is free? You think T-Mobile can't just say "Well Vimeo, for $1billion we can cut you in, for $10 billion you can be the exclusive video partner for unlimited data"

          • sihlkee

            Net Neutrality is not about limits? Maybe take a look at what the EFF has to say about data limits and zero-rating, which is what this is all about:

            https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2014/07/net-neutrality-and-transparency-principles-must-extend-mobile-internet-access-too

        • sihlkee

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality

          "Net neutrality (also network neutrality or Internet neutrality) is the principle that Internet service providers and governments should treat all data on the Internet equally, not discriminating or charging differentially by user, content, site, platform, application, type of attached equipment, and modes of communication."

          T-Mobile is violating the principle by charging differentially by content and site. It's de facto data favoritism.

          • enoch861

            Correct me if I'm wrong, but we're not aware if T-Mobile is charging music services to be in this program right?
            So lets say they're not charging for this service and any music service is free to "apply" to get in the program, would that be a violation of Net Neutrality? They're not favoring or discriminating per se since they're not denying any other music service from joining.
            I'm not taking sides at this point, I just want to get more clarification.

          • sihlkee

            T-Mobile, whether they charge or not to apply, should not be the arbiter of which services get unlimited data and which don't.

          • tekfr33kn

            They aren't the arbiter. Any service can apply. They still have to work out the backend so they can identify the service so that you don't get charged data usage when taping the server for that service.You seem to have a very incorrect view of what T-Mo is doing based on your other posts here. Perhaps some more reading would allow you to see the truth of it and you can relax.

          • Lucas Laws

            T-Mobile stated when the program started that they are not being paid to do this.

          • h4rr4r

            What sort of fantasy land do you live in?

          • tekfr33kn

            Faulty logic. They aren't charging extra for non-listed services. They are saying that it doesn't count against the data you have already paid for and can continue to use. Defacto, it's getting additional data usage with no additional charge. Therefore, there is absolutely NO violation of net neutrality.

          • sihlkee

            What horseshit. Let's say they set their data cap to 1MB. Now, you can stream Pandora for free as much as you want or use another service up to 1MB then get hit with overages. This absolutely violates the letter and intent of real net neutrality rules.

          • h4rr4r

            Yeah, and it would be a real shame if they started to so those companies had better pay up.

      • derp hurr-durr

        No data is free. Nice fantasy you got workin' there.

        • sihlkee

          It's called zero-rating. Yes, that data is free (as in, not subject to a limit) while other data isn't free (as in, subject to a limit with subsequent throttling or overages).

    • h4rr4r

      Consumers will favor these services to protect their data. Natural human behavior, this means ISPs picking winners. Which they will charge for.

  • mgamerz

    Wouldn't be surprised if T-Mo made google use less data for GPM. Cause god damn it sucks so much data compared to others.

  • Willie D

    Noticed they completely ignored TuneInRadio with was the next biggest after Google All Access.

  • rslh

    Sorry to be dense, but I am already on TMO Simple Choice plan. So in the future when TMO decides to add Google Play Music, will I need Google All Access to take advantage of this service?

    • tekfr33kn

      I has nothing to do with All Access. It's just Play Music (All Access or purchased/stored). At least that's what most of the blogs are reporting/rumoring. We'll have to wait and see to be sure.

      • rslh

        Thanks for taking your time to reply, tekfr33kn. I did some digging around and I think you're right. I hope all other providers will follow suit.

  • LSH99

    Companies that try this hard to shake up the status quo in that industry deserve some serious attention. T-Mobile's network may be worse than Verizon's, but I sure am looking forward to testing it out.

  • https://twitter.com/#!/psychomaniac189 psychomaniac189

    I've never heard of any of those but Grooveshark

  • http://www.geordienorman.com/ George Byers

    Posted this on some other android sites but... Something doesn't add up... Let's look at the app.. "Accuradio" it has less than 100,000 downloads yet am app such as tunein radio with 50 million active users is still not whitelisted. Then I looked at radio paradise which appears to be a independent real online radio station... T-Mobile's whitelisting process sure is strange, unless these companies and stations are paying them behind the scenes?

    On the note of Google play music still not being whitelisted, outside of the techworld, I really think it doesn't get that much traction compared to Spotify.

    • Brad

      i doubt a tiny app is able to pay for it if the big guys aren't.

  • h4rr4r

    Terrible idea.
    This will lead to the internet become the new cable. Service providers should not be allowed to pick winners.

    • Kevin

      Exactly. Good thing we picked the winner.

    • derp hurr-durr

      Who wins what, exactly?

      Not picking on you, but I have found that most folks following your line of thought are basing their opinions on false information (Throttling, caps, etc..)

      • sihlkee

        Most folks... like the EFF?

        • DrakeTungsten

          Especially the EFF.

      • h4rr4r

        The services that join.
        People will select those services over other competing services simply to save their data for other uses. Even if they don't normally use all their data cap.

        This at the very least requires colo, which a smaller competitor might not be equipped to do. It will one day require payments.

  • AuroraFlux

    It astonishes me how many good decisions T-Mobile makes and how they are the only ones bringing anything close to "real change" to an industry that historically rapes its customers, and people STILL find some way to give it negative spin.

    Legere has come out and said that the music companies aren't even involved in this process. They made the decision based on the fact that streaming media really eats your bandwidth, and they'd prefer you be able to use your network for more important things than streaming media.

    Maybe T-Mobile actually realized that "pushing everyone to the cloud and away from expandable storage" would be rather disingenuous if you had to pay to access your own cloud-based music?

    This isn't Verizon or AT&T. T-Mobile has everything to lose by making the wrong moves and I'm inclined to believe they are not in this case.

  • dude

    Too bad, would be useful if it wasn't for the 4 devices deauthorize limit, which isn't going to work with me being a Nexus and OnePlus user and installing roms. But then with 64gb internal, I'm set for now.

    • Aaron C

      ROM flashing doesn't increase device usage anymore. It's tied to serial # of the phone. This was a recent change in the last few months. I have reinstalled ROMs several times on my nexus 4 and contrary to the past, no additional "versions" of the phone showed up.

  • Mabel

    I just got T-Mobile and they told me that anything that downloaded through the Google Play store is included in that and I can stream it data free. Is this accurate? I like an app called 24 Seven that streams these particular web stations. And I did get it from the Play store....anybody know? I'm hoping this isn't just too good to be true. :

  • rudeboyrg

    AuroraFlux. Give it up. Mark Twain once said
    “Never argue with a fool, onlookers may not be able to tell the difference.”

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