17
Mar
swiftkey

Since what seems like forever, SwiftKey has been able to use SMS, Gmail, Facebook, Twitter, RSS Feeds, and Yahoo to "learn" your typing style and better predict your next words. All of these options work well, and now the SK team has added a couple more choices in the latest beta: Evernote and Google+.

Evernote personalization was added "in response to the great feedback" for SwiftKey Note on iOS, the team's first offering to iOS users; Google+ personalization was added because, well, people like to use G+, basically. Here's a look at the other changes found in the latest:

Changelog for the update:

  • Added personalization from Evernote
  • Added personalization from Google+ public posts
  • Improved UI for emoji
  • Improved emoji pane-switching performance
  • New Themes selection menu

Bug fixes:

  • Fixed mentioning people in Google+ posts
  • Quick period after emoji now works
  • Flow experience improved on layouts with main letters on secondary characters
  • Switched email @ button back from @outlook.com to @hotmail.com
  • Fixed problem with unsupported emoji being predicted (see a square in the prediction bar)
  • Fixed problem with smartspace inserting spaces between words and punctuation
  • Fixed several force closes and crashes

If you're a SwiftKey users and like to live on the edge, you can grab the latest beta download right here.

Cameron Summerson
Cameron is a self-made geek, Android enthusiast, horror movie fanatic, and musician. When he's not pounding keys here at AP, you can find him spending time with his wife and kids, plucking away on the 6- or 7-string, or watching The Texas Chainsaw Massacre on repeat.

  • Wazzifer

    I bought SwiftKey long time ago, but I don't remember the last time I actually used the paid version rather than the beta version.

    • Eszol

      +1 here. The type that can stand bugs

    • aouniat

      I'm on the same boat.

    • mesmorino

      You should try it actually, you might be surprised. The beta version just isn't as smooth/responsive as the stable version so every so often I switch back to it.

      • Thatguyfromvienna

        So the beta is even more laggy?
        OMG!

        • mesmorino

          Well I don't know about even more laggy, but the beta versions are usually laggier than the stable releases.

  • Dunkindonuts

    These guys really need to work on the keyboard themes. I wonder when that update comes out

    • Deeco

      Also, they need to address the keyboard onscreen popup lag, it is ridiculous.

      • kekkojoker90

        and add a new number row over the last row of letter

        • http://flavors.me/sabret00the sabret00the

          they've done that one.

          • kekkojoker90

            only in beta? i'm in the stable version and i can't find...

          • MdR guy

            The article says that the keyboard row was added in this beta...

          • kekkojoker90

            where do you see that?

          • kekkojoker90

            only in the beta :D ok now i'm happy

  • ash

    It could have been better if you would have posted the screenshot showing the changes.

  • faceless128

    "Switched email @ button back from @outlook.com to @hotmail.com"

    Yes!

  • Kucka

    In other words, it can now mine your information on Google Plus and Evernote .

    • dextersgenius

      It could already read your passwords and credit card info.

      Paranoid much?

      • mesmorino

        It can't read your passwords unless you type them in a normal text field. And even then, it won't know it's a password, and won't predict a text string unless you regularly and repeatedly type it

        • dextersgenius

          Why not? Technically it's possible. And it can know that it's a password because it automatically turns off autocorrect/dictionary when you type in a password field.

          • mesmorino

            No, it cannot know what what you're typing is a password. All it knows is that you are typing in a password field, which is where it turns off predictions.

            And in any case, that is same behaviour all the other keyboards have. What SwiftKey does differently is that it uses your text entry from other sources to refine it's prediction algorithms, and also add words to its dictionary.

            Unless you're in the habit of typing your passwords in text messages and emails, there is no place for SwiftKey to get them from. And if you are in that habit, then don't allow SwiftKey to mine those places for information.

            It cannot and does not read your passwords as part of normal usage

          • dextersgenius

            You're contradicting yourself. You're saying it cannot know what you're typing is a password, then you say that it knows you're tying in a password filed? What's preventing it from recording that info?

            My point is how do *you* know that it's not actually recording the keystrokes? Did you reverse engineer the app? Have you used packet capture tools to monitor the network traffic? Read any reports done by independent auditing agencies?

          • mesmorino

            I thought you might say that. No, I'm not contradicting myself. It knows that you're in a password field because the browser/OS tells it that you're in a password field. So, it turns off dictionary/prediction.

            But, it doesn't know that what you're typing is your password. If Your password is "Michael Jackson", and you type "sgtssdggsdgs", Swiftkey cannot know the difference, because it is not a mind reader.

            And no, I have not done any investigations, I am simply ascribing Swiftkey the same level of trust I am ascribing to the AOSP keyboard itself, which does exactly the same thing.

            Unless you're going to claim that ALL keyboards from stock android to touchwiz to iPhone to Windows Phone 8 can and do read your passwords, your claim is spurious at best, and nonsensical at worst.

            It's technically possible in the same way that spontaneous combustion is technically possible.

          • dextersgenius

            Look, I know it turns off dictionary - that much is obvious. What I'm saying is all your keystrokes - regardless of prediction on not - go thru the app. User inputs text to SwiftKey. SwiftKey then relays it to the app. Basically *everything* you type, password or not, is going thru SwiftKey. What's stopping it from storing the keystrokes in a separate encrypted database and uploading it to their servers, in the pretext of a cloud sync?

            As for the AOSP keyboard, it's open source and the code is peer-reviewed by thousands across the globe - there are no doubts to it's reputation, so it's ridiculous to trust SwiftKey to the same extent.

            Finally, I'm not making any claims. I'm merely exploring the *possibility* and the technicality of it. *You* on the other hand, are claiming that SwiftKey doesn't record your keystrokes secretly - but at the same time you're unable to provide any proof.

          • aouniat

            I've been using Swiftkey for a long time and every now and then I receive a text message saying "your credit card number ending with (####) <- I don't want my PC keyboard to record that. Anyway let's continue .. (has spend 20$ at Amazon. The available spending limit is $****). I know that Swiftkey guys are making those purchases, but I'm happy with this. Those guys are working hard and deserve few boxes of candy ... as long as they keep using my CC reasonably !

          • SSDROiD

            I sincerely for the love of all humanity hope that's a huge troll comment.

          • Lee

            If it bothers you that much, don't use it. Stop whining like a baby!

          • SSDROiD

            So trying to have a good discussion about SwiftKey and its data collction is whining like a baby? Your IQ must be through the roof! *the sarcasm here sure is*

          • Simon Belmont

            Hahaha. Time to add "tinfoil hat" to your dictionary of predicted words.

            Sure, they could steal your password, but I think after 3+ years of being on the market and millions of people served, they probably care more about the revenue from selling their product. By your logic, Microsoft or Google or Apple could steal your passwords and use them for nefarious deeds, too, because they produce the OS you use and enter passwords into (time to go live in a tree stump).

          • mesmorino

            Well, I don't have any proof but my assertion is based on logical deduction:

            -It is exhibiting the same behaviour that other keyboards do.
            -There is no reason to particularly suspect Swiftkey of nefarious behaviour.
            -Swiftkey is hardly a new or untested product and it is reasonable to presume that any untoward behaviour would have been noticed, if not actually rectified.
            -If we are going to ascribe suspicions to Swiftkey for doing what other keyboards do, then we have to ascribe the same suspicions to ALL of them

            You, on the other hand are are taking a remote possibility and holding onto it as if it is a definite occurence.

            You have no more proof that it is collecting passwords than I do that it isn't, and the overwhelming likelihood is that it isn't, any more than any other keyboard is.

            Your original comment was baseless and if it's proof you're after, please provide proof to support your original statement. After all you're the one who started with the assertion to wit:

            "It could already read your passwords and credit card info.

            Paranoid much?"

          • Guest

            - Going by reputation alone is hardly "logical deduction".

            > "It is exhibiting the same behaviour that other keyboards do."

            - Not necessarily, SwiftKey syncs encrypted data to the cloud, which is one of the features that sets it apart from other keyboards.

            > "any untoward behaviour would have been noticed"

            - Yes, just like everyone noticed the government/NSA was spying on them right? Oh wait, they didn't, until Snowden blew the whistle.

            > "if we are going to ascribe suspicions to Swiftkey for doing what other keyboards do, then we have to ascribe the same suspicions to ALL of them"

            - And as I've mentioned before, the AOSP keyboard is open-source and it's code has been peer-reviewed countless times, so you can't really compare the two. Also, SwiftKey does sync your data with their servers so there's always a privacy concern there. Besides, this discussion is about SwiftKey, not Swype or other keyboards.

            > "You, on the other hand are are taking a remote possibility and holding onto it as if it is a definite occurence."

            - I'm merely debating a theory in a logical and technical manner and I continued the discussion because I was simply curious if you were aware if any studies had been done for this, because the way you were presenting your argument was as if you had solid proof.

            > "You have no more proof that it is collecting passwords than I do that it isn't, and the overwhelming likelihood is that it isn't, any
            more than any other keyboard is."

            - Agreed, but neither do you.

            > "Your original comment was baseless and if it's proof you're after, please provide proof to support your original statement. After all you're the one who started with the assertion"

            And were the one who took my comment completely out of context.
            Personally, just for the record - since obviously the idiots above you don't know I'm playing the devils advocate - I've been using SwiftKey every since it was out as a beta 4 years ago, and I've never had any privacy concerns. I purchased the app as soon as it was officially available and I continue to use it, including this beta. So rest assured I have no malintent against SwiftKey, I'm merely debating from a technical point of view.

            Now that that's out of the way, my original comment, which was a reply to @Kucka still holds valid, and let me put it in plain English the intent of my comment - it was meant to imply that the OP was being paranoid because if he's *really* concerned that SwiftKey is mining data from our accounts, then he has bigger things to worry about, since they could be potentially logging your passwords and other info, IF they had malicious intent.

          • Guest

            - Going by reputation alone is hardly "logical deduction".

            > "It is exhibiting the same behaviour that other keyboards do."

            - Not necessarily, SwiftKey syncs encrypted data to the cloud, which is one of the features that sets it apart from other keyboards.

            > "any untoward behaviour would have been noticed"

            - Yes, just like everyone noticed the government/NSA was spying on them right? Oh wait, they didn't, until Snowden blew the whistle.

            > "if we are going to ascribe suspicions to Swiftkey for doing what other keyboards do, then we have to ascribe the same suspicions to ALL of them"

            - And as I've mentioned before, the AOSP keyboard is open-source and it's code has been peer-reviewed countless times, so you can't really compare the two. Also, SwiftKey does sync your data with their servers so there's always a privacy concern there. Besides, this discussion is about SwiftKey, not Swype or other keyboards.

            > "You, on the other hand are are taking a remote possibility and holding onto it as if it is a definite occurence."

            - I'm merely debating a theory in a logical and technical manner and I continued the discussion because I was simply curious if you were aware if any studies had been done for this, because the way you were presenting your argument was as if you had solid proof.

            > "You have no more proof that it is collecting passwords than I do that it isn't, and the overwhelming likelihood is that it isn't, any
            more than any other keyboard is."

            - Agreed, but neither do you.

            > "Your original comment was baseless and if it's proof you're after, please provide proof to support your original statement. After all you're the one who started with the assertion"

            And were the one who took my comment completely out of context.
            Personally, just for the record - since obviously the idiots above you don't know I'm playing the devils advocate - I've been using SwiftKey every since it was out as a beta 4 years ago, and I've never had any privacy concerns. I purchased the app as soon as it was officially available and I continue to use it, including this beta. So rest assured I have no malintent against SwiftKey, I'm merely debating from a technical point of view.

            Now that that's out of the way, my original comment, which was a reply to @Kucka still holds valid, and let me put it in plain English the intent of my comment - it was meant to imply that the OP was being paranoid because if he's *really* concerned that SwiftKey is mining data from our accounts, then he has bigger things to worry about, since they could be potentially logging your passwords and other info, IF they had malicious intent.

          • dextersgenius

            - Going by reputation alone is hardly "logical deduction".

            > "It is exhibiting the same behaviour that other keyboards do."

            - Not necessarily, SwiftKey syncs encrypted data to the cloud, which is one of the features that sets it apart from other keyboards.

            > "any untoward behaviour would have been noticed"

            - Yes, just like everyone noticed the government/NSA was spying on them right? Oh wait, they didn't, until Snowden blew the whistle.

            > "if we are going to ascribe suspicions to Swiftkey for doing
            what other keyboards do, then we have to ascribe the same suspicions to ALL of them"

            - And as I've mentioned before, the AOSP keyboard is open-source and it's code has been peer-reviewed countless times, so you can't really compare the two. Also, SwiftKey does sync your data with their servers so there's always a privacy concern there. Besides, this discussion is about SwiftKey, not Swype or other keyboards.

            > "You, on the other hand are are taking a remote possibility and holding onto it as if it is a definite occurence."

            - I'm merely debating a theory in a logical and technical manner and I continued the discussion because I was simply curious if you were aware if any studies had been done for this, because the way you were presenting your argument was as if you had solid proof.

            > "You have no more proof that it is collecting passwords than I
            do that it isn't, and the overwhelming likelihood is that it isn't, any
            more than any other keyboard is."

            - Agreed, but neither do you.

            > "Your original comment was baseless and if it's proof you're
            after, please provide proof to support your original statement. After all you're the one who started with the assertion"

            And were the one who took my comment completely out of context. Personally, just for the record - since obviously the idiots above you don't know I'm playing the devils advocate - I've been using SwiftKey every since it was out as a beta 4 years ago, and I've never had any privacy concerns. I purchased the app as soon as it was officially available and I continue to use it, including this beta. So rest assured I have no malicious intent against SwiftKey, I'm merely debating a possibility from a technical point of view.

            Now that that's out of the way, my original comment, which was a
            reply to @Kucka still holds valid, and let me put it in plain English
            the intent of my comment - it was meant to imply that the OP was being paranoid because if he's *really* concerned that SwiftKey is mining data from our accounts, then he has bigger things to worry about, since they could be potentially logging your passwords and other info, IF they had malicious intent. The "paranoid much" statement was meant to imply that OP was being paranoid, and with that, the intent of my comment should have been clear. I never mentioned at that stage what MY opinion is to whether they *do* actually have any malicious intent or not, but you misunderstood my stand on this, which was originally a technical argument as to whether or not *technically* it was possible for SwiftKey to read the keystrokes.

            So in summary, technically is it possible for SwiftKey to intercept all our keystrokes including passwords? Yes. But what are the chances that it's actually doing so? Slim (based on reputation and trust).

            Now unless you have anything else to add to this stupid debate, I suggest not replying to my comment and ending it here.

          • mesmorino

            Alright, call it deductive reasoning, or logical inference. Or whatever you want really, what it's called isn't as important as what it is, which is a chain of thought I based said assertion on.

            But no, I did not take your comment out of context, it had no context: It is literally two lines! You said it can read your passwords, I said it can't, and then we got into this kerfuffle about whether it's technically possible and so on and so on.

            Plus, just ignore the idiots, I usually do.

  • Konstigt2

    Can it read from Hangouts? Both sms and well, "native" Hangout messages?

  • Mah Gwo Huei

    If could add Whatsapp personalization, even better.

  • Simon Belmont

    Looking forward to the emoji support going stable soon, hopefully. The only place I can do emoji right now is with SwiftKey is in Hangouts and I think that's just part of the Hangouts app.

    Speaking of the emoji chooser in the Hangouts app, it becomes REALLY laggy once in a while, to the point of drawing individual emoji slowly and not wanting to scroll. I have a Snapdragon 800 in my Nexus 5, and this lagginess is ridiculous (only place I've EVER seen lag on my N5).

  • Michael

    How's this vs the Google Keyboard swype?

  • Brad

    I wish the emoji would make it to the stable release

  • BRNSMRF

    I recently went back to Google's keyboard. SwiftKey gets too slow after a while

  • Wilson Lim

    I'm still waiting for the SwiftKey team to add support for the Chinese language...

  • SSDROiD

    "Fixed problem with smartspace inserting spaces between words and punctuation"

    Does that mean SwiftKey won't do the auto-spacing thing anymore, or is "smartspace" different?