11
Dec
Sheets-Thumb

Google has rebuilt Sheets, the spreadsheet-related portion of its online office suite, and is making the new version available immediately. None of these changes directly affect the Android version of the app, but given that this is the desktop browser-based companion to what Google would consider the platform's best spreadsheet editor, it may be time to give the service another go if you aren't already a committed user. The new version of Sheets comes with a range of new features, including offline support. Now users can work offline and have their files automatically update after reconnecting.

The new Google Sheets can handle millions of cells spread across any number of rows and columns. Scrolling should be faster, even in complex documents. There's also Filter Views, a new unique feature that lets you save custom views of data that alter how you see a spreadsheet without affecting how it looks for others.

FilterViews

When entering formulas, Sheets now provides examples and summaries of each argument as you type. There are also 20 new functions, such as AVERAGEIF, SUMIFS, COUNTIFS, WEEKNUM, and TIMEVALUE. Text also now automatically flows into empty adjacent cells, saving users from having to manually merge them.

Autoflow

Before you switch to the new version, you should know that there are some features that haven't yet made it in. These include spell check, API support, notification rules, publishing, and protected sheets and ranges. If you do opt-in, the decision will only affect new spreadsheets. Old spreadsheets will still open in the older version they were created in.

Source: Google

Bertel King, Jr.
Born and raised in the rural South, Bertel knows what it's like to live without 4G LTE - or 3G, for that matter. The only things he likes sweeter than his tea are his gadgets, and while few objects burn more than a metal phone on a summer day, he prefers them that way anyway.

  • Wazzifer

    Expect a new Office commercial making fun of this tomorrow. God, I hate MSFT.

    • Brendan Dillon

      Microsoft isn't any worse than any other company with marketing. Remember the Mac v. PC commercials? It's not like they're paying people to slander their competitors products on forums like Samsung did to HTC. As fond as I am of Sheets, Excel still beats the pants off of it for power use.

      • Phil Oakley

        Mac vs PC wasn't Google...it was Apple. And it was not nearly as bad as Scroogled is. Mac vs. PC seems like a bit of light hearted banter, aimed at the PC industry in general. Scroogled is a low advertising campaign aimed at slandering Google.

        • Brendan Dillon

          I meant to say Microsoft isn't any worse than any other company. Brain fart on my part, i'll correct that.
          Scroogled is no more slanderous than the Mac v. Pc ads were. it certainly wasn't light-hearted, unless you were an Apple fanboi. To MS fanbois, I'm sure the Scroogled ads seem lighthearted.

          • Sir_Brizz

            I always hated the Mac vs. PC ads, but they were absolutely not as ridiculous as the Scroogled campaign. They may have contained just as many blatant falsehoods, though.

          • Brendan Dillon

            I think the difference is that the Mac v. PC ads were simply better made ads. They were sharp, they were cool and they were so well done you almost didn't think about the fact that Apple was so completely full of crap in much of what they were saying. Which isn't surprising from a company that hyped up Copy/Paste as a 'feature' (and managed to get people to buy into that).

          • Sir_Brizz

            Yeah, I definitely think you're on to something there. Plus, they weren't over the top or trying to play off the modern meme culture "OOOH, YOU GOT SCROOGLED" sort of stuff. They were just straight to the point.

            I've kind of always felt that about Microsoft, though. Where Apple kind of drives pop culture, Microsoft always tries to feed off of it. That leads them to using terrible "trendy" songs and cheesy, awful dialogue and ruins all of their delivery. I still can't get over how depressingly awful their recent Internet Explorer ads were...

      • Wazzifer

        For corporate and business use, I could tell you that Excel is superior. But for personal use? Google Sheets is obviously the winner here..since you know, it's free and efficient.

        • Brendan Dillon

          Which is exactly how my own experience has been. Professionally, Excel, personally Sheets (usually).

          • didibus

            Well, we shall see with this new version though.

        • weh

          If your definition of personal use, is viewing docs created by other people, then yes. If you actually make docs, then Google Sheets is shite.

          • Brendan Dillon

            Thanks for that well-reasoned comment. I have no idea how I managed to put together the 50+ spreadsheets that I personally use in Google Sheets with it being 'shite'.

    • Nick

      Referring to a company by their ticker symbol...what is this? Yahoo Finance?

      • Wazzifer

        I fixed it just for you, I hope you feel even more superior and will sleep soundly tonight.

    • sg

      Hope you posted this from an Android/Mac. Otherwise, it would be pretty embarrassing.

      • Wazzifer

        Posted from my Chromebook, smartass.

  • xsirxx

    So whats the viability nowadays for businesses to switch from microsoft to google for spreadsheets?

    • Brendan Dillon

      Low. Some really basic functionality still needs to be added (like vertical text). This is a step in the right direction, but it still falls short of Excel. I look forward to the day when it doesn't though.

      • xsirxx

        what about formulas and such?

        • Brendan Dillon

          It's getting there and I would say that all of the formulas that most people use are available in Sheets. However, if you're a power user of excel, it's very possible that you'll find formulas that aren't in Sheets.

    • jayray78

      I switched my company last year. The fact that it was free and free online backup/collaboration was exactly what we were looking for.

      • Sir_Brizz

        You mean included in the price of Google Apps, right? Google Apps for Business is cheaper than Exchange hosting plus it comes with all the other Google applications.

        • jayray78

          Less than 10 people is free.

          • Sir_Brizz

            They ended that, though, right? Or is there a way to take that deal still?

            EDIT: it looks like they stopped doing it about a year ago.

          • jayray78

            Must be a grandfathering then. We are still free.

    • Sir_Brizz

      It depends on how complicated your needs are. For most basic uses, it's completely viable. If your CEO does complex queries on the data in Excel, he won't like the lack of that stuff in Sheets. However, it could mean you only need 1 license of Office and everyone else can use Sheets.

  • Luis

    Yet we still can't select multiple non-adjacent cells.
    Is that as complex as programming the LHC??

  • Joey

    Protected Ranges are supported I believe. I use them myself https://support.google.com/drive/answer/63175?hl=en

  • UtopiaNH

    I really would like vlookup and hlookup features added to this :/

    • Brendan Dillon

      Vlookup and Hlookup are both available in Sheets. If they weren't I wouldn't recommend Sheets to ANY professional user.

  • GazaIan

    Okay, I need a little help. I'm a total noob to spreadsheets, never used Excel but Google Drive seems pretty damn useful, and I want to make use of the spreadsheets. How can I title a column, such that when I click on that titles the entire chart will sort based on either the numerical, chronological (for dates) or alphabetical order of that column?

  • http://www.LOVEanon.org/ Michael Oghia (Ogie)

    Forgive me for potentially making a big deal out of nothing, but how the hell can you exclude spell check? That's just a staple of digital tools now (because spreadsheets are used for way more than numbers). It just seems like an odd feature to leave out...

    • Paul Taylor

      The article says "there are some features that haven't yet made it in. These include spell check". Haven't YET made it in. Nothing about it being removed altogether.

      • http://www.LOVEanon.org/ Michael Oghia (Ogie)

        Yeah man, I saw that. Sorry for overreacting :) Props to Google for not releasing an unfinished product

  • http://www.LOVEanon.org/ Michael Oghia (Ogie)

    Don't know where my original comment went (I was saying how can you exclude spell check??), but I'll just say this:

    UPDATE: The actual language on the Google form says, "Warning: some features aren’t ready yet." Meaning, they might come later (e.g., spell check). That's definitely different from removed altogether.