16
Aug
unnamed (19)

The Geekbench benchmarking program is a staple on PCs, thanks to quick and varied tests for multiple hardware systems and an impressive database of results. The Geekbench 2 test has been gaining steam on Android as well - we've used it in a few reviews and comparisons. Version 3 has been released as a stand-alone app, but the small list of improvements hardly seems to justify it. It's a good thing that it only costs a dollar.

2013-08-16 16.36.47 2013-08-16 16.36.57 2013-08-16 16.37.19

The biggest change in Geekbench 3 is that the primary rating is split into single-core and multi-core scores. Previous versions were more than capable of testing multi-core processors, but splitting up the score allows users to better predict how single and multi-threaded apps will perform. There are a handful of new floating point, integer, and memory tests, but frankly there were so many before that these additions don't seem all that important. All the tests are optimized for multiple cores. Hardware information and score uploading features remain intact.

There are two notable changes to the interface: one, a progress meter for the test. That's nice, but it really should have been added to the old Geekbench 2 app (also $1). And two: the comparison to other Android phones is nowhere to be seen. I've looked through the app and it seems to have disappeared. Here's hoping it arrives in an update soon.

Jeremiah Rice
Jeremiah is a US-based blogger who bought a Nexus One the day it came out and never looked back. In his spare time he watches Star Trek, cooks eggs, and completely fails to write novels.
  • louched1

    Now I can find out how good my phone is at running Geekbench 3!

  • Stacey Liu

    Interesting. According to some recently uploaded results, the iPhone 5 gets a single core score of ~700 while the HTC One gets ~500. This means Swift is quite a bit faster than Krait 300. And let's not forget, the iPhone is at 1.3 GHz while the Krait is at 1.7. The HTC Obviously won the multi-core test... (1600 to 1200), but that tells us very little about the architectures.

    • Tamadrummer94

      That's kind of startling. What phone was tested in the image above?

      • Cheeseball

        Motorola Droid Razr HD

        • Tamadrummer94

          I wonder if the Moto X would test slower, probably.

    • Cheeseball

      This may not be surprising considering that the Apple Swift A6 is a Cortex-A9 and A15 hybrid.

      • Stacey Liu

        So is Krait.

    • jetsetbilly

      My HTC one gets 625 when tested so quite a bit higher than you suggest, although found it did drop to 503 with the power saver on. And multi core performance beats the iPhone by even more 1893 to 1200. :-D

      • Stacey Liu

        That's good to hear. I only found one HTC One result uploaded earlier and I compared it to a random iPhone 5 test, so it's likely that the average numbers are actually quite different.

      • Andrew T Roach

        With 2 more cores.

        • jetsetbilly

          Yeah and HTC is much cooler looking, stereo vs mono, much better resolution.... :-D

    • Andrew T Roach

      It shouldn't be a huge surprise. Geekbench 2 always showed that the A6 had a significant advantage in memory bandwidth performance. Perhaps that is weighted more highly in real world performance.

  • Awais

    My S4 gets a 770 Single and 2028 multi core. Which means it is marginally faster than iphone5 in single core performance.