31
Jul
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It's here! Microsoft Office is finally here! Well, sort of. Following a similar release on the iPhone several months ago, Microsoft has released the official Office for 365 app for Android, as promised. It's a companion application for their cloud-enabled Office subscription service, and in order to use it, you'll need to be an Office 365 subscriber - plans start at $60 a year for a single user.

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Office 365 is only available for Android phones. Tablets aren't invited to the syncing suite party. Microsoft has similar restrictions on iOS, where iPads are left out in the cold. Though they haven't explicitly said so, it's assumed that this is to keep the app as an exclusive for Microsoft's Windows 8 and Windows RT platforms (and the latter could certainly use all the help it can get). Even so, it's a shame: tablets are where one would really want to use this sort of thing.

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The app can view all Office documents, and create and edit files for Word, Excel, and Powerpoint. Offline edits are synced to the cloud upon connecting, a nice perk for frequent air travelers. Other cloud features include a list of recently-updated documents that syncs with the desktop version of Office 365, Kindle-style consistent reading progress, a sharing and commenting system, and access to Skydrive and Sharepoint.

Office 365 looks considerably more capable than Google's basic Drive/Docs service, but it's up to you to decide if the extra functionality is worth the price. If you've got access to the desktop and web version of Office 365 through a license from your employer, you should be able to log in without a separate subscription.

Source: Microsoft Office Blog

Jeremiah Rice
Jeremiah is a US-based blogger who bought a Nexus One the day it came out and never looked back. In his spare time he watches Star Trek, cooks eggs, and completely fails to write novels.
  • http://www.Nave360.com Sebastian Gorgon

    So you need a subscription, well then, no thank you.

    I don't use it enough for it to be worth, i just want Office for the sake of having Office when you need it.

    • Danny Davis

      Yes outside the WP ecosystem they make you pay, but I think you don't have to pay extra if you're already a subscriber with 365.

      • http://www.Nave360.com Sebastian Gorgon

        I'd be more than happy to pay for it if it was reasonably priced and at a one off cost. Now i just wish Google Docs had a dedicated Android app, don't like drive.

        • Eric Anderson

          It is reasonably priced, and if you are a student it's a steal. It's much cheaper than previous versions of Office I believe, especially if you have more than 1 computer in your house.

          • http://www.Nave360.com Sebastian Gorgon

            But i only want it for when i need it, truth be told it would be hard for me to use it more than 10 times a year. Which is why Google Docs is perfect as it's free.

          • Eric Anderson

            If that's your situation, then yes this isn't a smart purchase for you. Good call. Many people, especially in school, need to use it much more than that.

          • http://www.Nave360.com Sebastian Gorgon

            Yep, if you are in College or University then going with this is smart unless you can live on Google Docs.

          • Rob

            Maybe it's not the same thing, but my college makes the latest version of Office (PC and Mac) available via academic pricing for $15, I believe. That said, Google Docs is my 2nd go-to service but they still need to build some features into it to make it compete with Office on a 1-to-1 basis.

  • Danny Davis

    One reason I'm glad I have a WP8. No fees free 365. Although this may be short live on pricing of the Moto X.

  • http://revanmj.pl/ Michał Jakubowski

    Could someone upload an APK for those who are not living in the US? I don't want to wait few weeks before they release it in other countries.

    • http://hqraja.com/ Haroon Q. Raja

      Yes, please. Hate these US-only launches, when these companies are monetizing from users from all over the world.

    • Eric Anderson

      Do you have an Office 365 subscription? You know it won't do anything without that, right?

      • http://revanmj.pl/ Michał Jakubowski

        Yes I have one. Besides, you can always use 30 day trial of Office 365 Home Premium :)

    • Marco Roncal Vivanco

      https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tunnelbear.android try this app out ;) It makes the playstore think you're in the US or germany or UK :D

      • http://revanmj.pl/ Michał Jakubowski

        Thanks, that did the trick.

        • Elad Avron

          Doesn't work for me. Did you do anything other than turn on the VPN?

          • http://revanmj.pl/ Michał Jakubowski

            Yes, I changed primary language for the account I used to English US and also changed carrier ID to AT&T via Market Helper app.

          • Elad Avron

            K, I'll try that.

          • Carlos M

            Close Google Play, go to Settings -> Manage Apps -> All -> Google PLay and "Clear Data". Now next time you open Google Play, it will be in the US version. Tip: I'm from Chile so I use it to update Google Play Music and now Google Keyboard too :)

          • Carlos M

            Oh, yes, and remember to have your VPN ON, I use TunnerBear

      • Elad Avron

        Never seems to work for Play Store anyway

    • http://revanmj.pl/ Michał Jakubowski
  • littlevince

    Can it open local files? Cuz that's the one thing I wish Google Drive could do. :/

    • http://revanmj.pl/ Michał Jakubowski

      Yes, it can. Just checked.

  • CamWiseOwl

    People still use Office? Mental.

    • Danny Davis

      Hmmm what corporate enterprise doesn't?

      • CamWiseOwl

        Ours doesn't, we use Numbers & Pages (for Mac) combined with Dropbox to share, and Google Docs.

        I'm not saying nobody does and nobody should, I'm saying there's lots (or "a handful") of free alternatives out there which are as good, if not better than Microsoft Office.

        • Danny Davis

          And I'm sure that's a small share compared to corporations still using Office. Personally and professionally, I'd be scared to invest into Dropbox or Google Docs and have Google decide they want to pull the plug like they done other applications lately. I doubt Dropbox would go anywhere on a cloud sense, but I'd never want to store or use anything with Google Docs as of late.

          • CamWiseOwl

            Like I said "I'm not saying nobody does and nobody should".
            Mission Critical documents are done in Pages for Mac and Dropbox'd - or email if it's a single person.
            Lesser important docs are on Google docs just for the ease, I doubt Google will bench it anytime soon though, lots more Drive stuff happening and integration...

            Oh and can't forget Evernote, we use it to write reports and such and then paste into an email (but keeping the note for quick reference).

            Lots of ways to work it :)

          • Danny Davis

            I feel what you're saying. Just responding to your initial reply.

          • PhoenixPath

            Seems counter-intuitive. Pages, dropbox, docs, email, evernote...

            ...or Office.

            You must have some talented people working there. Most corporate folks I've met prefer KISS...even if it's more expensive.

            I admit, I am a *huge* fan of Numbers...and have always wished Apple would port that suite to Windows/*nix, but all of those applications/interfaces...

            Man...kudos on whoever set this scenario up for you and getting the user buy-in on it. That had to be fun.

          • CamWiseOwl

            It really depends on the type of work you're doing here I suppose.

            Basically Dropbox and Email are our methods of sharing work done in Pages.
            Evernote I find to be easier to compose reports or be faster at firing quick things off to people.
            GDocs are "special case", like sharing certain info with clients or out of office workers (on the move people who usually have full inboxes)

            Content teams use Pages, then share it with the production manager through Dropbox, or email it if it goes to some other person.

            - it's simpler in practise than what it sounds aha.

    • Chris Talty

      Macros, pivot tables...

      Excel is still unmatched unfortunately.

  • Zak Taccardi

    Microsoft not playing nice when you dare venture out of their ecosystem, there's a surprise.

    I bet there are a bunch of people who would like to use Google drive to store files and word to edit them - I'm guessing Microsoft does not make that easy

    • Danny Davis

      You mean like the way Google wont play fair not developing any of its apps for MS. Not even making an official YouTube app for WP and making MS cease and desist when they make one? Yeah...

      • TheWhiteLotus

        WP doesn't have enough market share to devote enough time to make an official app. MS made one that didn't display ads, which is how YouTube makes any money at all. Learn something before speaking please.

        • Danny Davis

          And this is different from what other third party app on all the ecosystem that does the same? Or did you firget about youtube downloader apps that on Amazon app store. I know exactly what I'm talking about. I know the app didn't display ads and allowed download. What third party app doesn't? Why not shut down MetroTube. I think you need to learn. But don't insulting me cause you don't like my response

          • Cristi13

            Well i think google will eventually make a move about apps like metro tube like instagram made with instance ( i guess these 3rd party devs need to pay the respective company a fee for creating their own client).

          • Danny Davis

            I don't think you understand what APIs are for.

          • Brian Koppe

            You're citing apps that are on the Amazon App Store, not Google Play. Apps that allow for downloading of YouTube videos are violations of the Google Play TOS and they are, in fact, shut down. Same goes for Chrome extensions.

      • Zak Taccardi

        Windows phone has no market penetration, it makes sense for companies not to release apps on that platform. Very few people use it. Google services work great on either android or iOS.

        And the YouTube app violated Google's terms of service by deliberately skipping ads.

        Google also has an HTML5 mobile web app for nearly all its services, so while you may prefer a native application, Google has still made it possible to access those services from anywhere.

        • Danny Davis

          Lol no market penetration. YouTube viloate but no cease and desist for other third party app that does the same? But they make native apps for iPhone? But you say they got sites? And that's being fair and Google parade having equalness in ecosystems? Last I check almost every major app except a slight few have apps in the pipeline. Other countries have ditch iPhones and Blackberry in favor of WP. I can't tell there's no market when MS, as small as the percetage is, is having the biggest gain.

          • Dalian barons

            You can't expect them to make all there apps for every bloody os out their. ATM windows phone is too small but I'm sure if it gets bige enough Google will makes apps for it

          • Danny Davis

            To be honest I don't care if Google makes apps for WP. That's what I have a Nexus for. I'm saying you can't call the kettle black when you're the teapot. They didn't have a problem making a google search app. YouTube is used by everyone. Who doesn't use it. If you're Google and you say WP market share is too small to develop, why do you care about a small percentage of users who uses a MS developed app? Surely those small users wont effect the vast amount of Google and Apple plays.

          • Chris Talty

            As I said elsewhere, they cared because it was literally called Youtube, and pretended to be an official app.

            They haven't done anything about Metrotube or any other third party app.

          • Danny Davis

            They cared because it was a competative company who created the YouTube app because Google refused it. They had this app in the pipeline for month waiting to get Google approval to release it to the market and Google and pulling the bs. They are not masking to make it some official app. MS has a Facebook app because FB hasn't made an official one. MS is trying to fill gaps where developers are leaving holes. This whole cease and desist was because of API violations and downloads. The same thing that most 3rd party clients are doing. There's a reason why Google keep changing their APIs leaving client to fix the issues. This has nothing to do about the name. Google didn't have a problem when MS was using the YouTube name for an app that was a link to YouTube mobile site. You are completely wrong about the issue.

          • mechapathy

            "It's funny people always talk market and forget where Android was 3 years ago."
            You've got a point there. But it's kind of a weak one. Let's just use the US market as an example.
            Android came along as an alternative to people who wanted a touch-driven smartphone OS with an app ecosystem, but didn't like/couldn't get an iPhone. With Android phones on all major carriers, and the iPhone only available on AT&T until 2011, Android had a major advantage.

            In addition to that, Android OEMs could offer low-cost devices to further encourage the adoption of smartphones by people who are put off by up-front device cost. It was a perfect storm of availability, cost, and variety. This, obviously, propelled Android to almost double the marketshare of iOS, by filling in the gaps.

            Then Microsoft comes along, and decides to try the same thing. The problem is, the gaps are mostly filled. There's no room for Microsoft and their lack of developer support. iOS and Android own the market, and there's a huge chance that someone who is looking to get into their first smartphone is going to go with one of those two platforms. Why? Because that's what their friends are using. Microsoft isn't a big enough disruption. They simply can't offer enough to entice people away from what they already know.

          • Danny Davis

            That's a cop out excuse. MS is having the best increase in numbers compared to the other two. Now of course 5% is a drop on the bucket, but it is a solid third in the market, however small that may be. To say they can't offer enough is a vague statement when the innovative Nokia 1020 dropped with unmatched camera for high end and a penetrating Nokia 520 hitting all carriers on the low end. Sprint just picked up the Samsung ATIV S Neo as well as the revamped HTC 8XT. China Oppo is getting into the market with an WP Oppo to match as well as Huwei. Once GDR2 and GDR3 updates come will provide more room for MFR to expand in specs. There are a slew of WP8 getting pick up in other countries on the low end with the 520 and new 620. MS will offer that niche for people who want simplicity but doesn't want an iPhone. Most early adaptors are coming from Android. I mean how hard is ATT is pushing the 1020 in the states. Nokia is leading the way for WP and pushing and working with devs to get stuff pushed thru the pipeline. WP is going no where. It will never be as big as Android, but it will become a new competitor

          • mechapathy

            What's a cop out excuse? And I never said there aren't plenty of WP8 phones to choose from. I said: "Then Microsoft comes along, and decides to try the same thing. The problem is, the gaps are mostly filled." Android was there at just the right time, before the market was mature. Microsoft entered too late, with the same strategy. That was the point of my post.

            Not to mention Nokias public displeasure with Microsoft at the moment. What happens when Nokia says "screw you guys, we're going to a platform that can keep up with our pace?" Things weren't looking good before, and now they're looking worse after Microsofts biggest (only?) exclusive OEM calls them out in public. Nokias hardware is hands-down the biggest draw to WP. If they're out, it's pretty much over for WP.

            If Microsoft wants to make WP a success in a market with two mature app ecosystems, it needs to make the deals necessary to get major app development for its platform. It's too late for the wait and see approach that worked for Android. Developer draw is fueled by adoption rates, and at the moment, WP doesn't have good enough numbers to throw money at. So Microsoft needs to start throwing money at developers. It's really a matter of supply and demand. There's not enough demand.

            Also, "Most early adaptors are coming from Android." Source?

          • Danny Davis

            Nokia will never go outside the MS ecosytem. For one they still tied onto contract with MS and Elop has made it clear that Android ecosystem is to crowded gor another mfr entry. The fact they are displeased with MS speed does not mean they are leaving. By the time GDR3 is pushed will allow mfr to push for better hardware and software.

            http://www.wpcentral.com/microsoft--23-user-upgrades-windows-phone-android

            And there's your source direct from the Build conference. There is a plenty of room from people to move into the smartphone market. MS will be fine. They had a sliw three year start but having the best year yet. And with more carriers opening more and bringing in products they will continue to grow. They are not to late. Its not like there no room for growth. Many foreign company have moved to MS for their phones and two Russian carriers stop pushing iPhone and moved to increase pushing WP8. There's more to the world than just the US.

          • mechapathy

            "42% of Windows Phone devices were upgrades from 'feature phone' to smartphone." That doesn't sound like most, when only 23% came from Android. 42>23. So it's actually "Most early adopters are coming from feature phones." I mean, that's what I would have said if I read those stats.

            Also, don't use "There's more to the world than just the US" as an attempt to invalidate my argument. The rest of the world is ALSO being dominated by Android.

            The major apps thing is great. They're key to getting user interest, and users are key to getting smaller developer interest. But many consumers now, with two mature and diverse app ecosystems, don't want to hear "soon." They want to hear "now." If a platform can't deliver "now," there are two others that can. That's how this market works, because there's more than one mature, viable option.

            It began the same way with Android, but things got off the ground because in many cases people had no choice but to adopt Android if they wanted a modern smartphone experience. That's the point I've been making this whole time. The time was right for Android. If Microsoft had gotten themselves in the market then, we might be looking at an entirely different story. But you can't just say "well it worked for Android, so it'll work for WP." It's clearly not working. If you'll remember, by the three-year mark Android was already well on its way to engulfing the smartphone market.

            And my claims are certainly not baseless. Look at YOY growth in market share for both platforms. You can use 2009-2011 for Android, since that'll represent Androids first 3 public years.

            I'll tell you what. How about we meet here, on an Android blog no less, in a year, and we'll see what has happened.

          • Danny Davis

            Well I miss quoted myself on the android part. I wasn't thinking about dumb phones I was thinking out the 3 ecosystems. So sorry that was so confusing to the world.

            And my statement stands on the rest of the world. Of course the world is dominated by Android. Isn't that an agreement? There's almost a billion activation. Point is there are still billion of room for adaption. Nokia is a worldwide brand. There's plenty of room for a third competitor.

          • Danny Davis

            I'll take your wager. Hopefully we remeber. I'll even puy up a Groupon $10 gift card in it if your game.

          • Chris Talty

            Were any of the other third party apps using the name Youtube?

            Masquerading as an official app?

            No.

          • Danny Davis

            That wasn't even the reason why they pulled the app. It had nothing to do with that. There are third party apps in the WP ecosystem that blantantly uses Gmail for the name of the app. That hasn't been pulled. I'm using it right now. So once again...

          • talont

            The name had nothing to do with it. It's still called Youtube. They were even willing to include ads if they had access to googles ad API, but MS was forced to use HTML5 instead making a inferior experience.

          • Cristi13

            Android 3 years ago was already becoming the most dominant os.

          • Danny Davis

            Android is just now with the last year became the dominant. 3 years ago they were on Froyo that barely had a following with the Nexus One. Alot of this was helped from Samsung Galaxy Series. I had the Nexus One three years ago and the app felt non existent. No one wanted to developed for it. Everyone only cared about iOS. It took Android 5 years to get where they are now and 3 years (comparison) for them to even being accepted in the market as a competitor for iOS. It took ICS to launch them in the stratosphere cause HC was a flop and nobody hardly cared about GB. 3 years ago they were barely getting noticed.

          • Cristi13

            Actually, android was becoming the most used os on smartphones in q4 2010 http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2011/jan/31/android-symbian-smartphone-sales but it became the most popular when it comes to all phones combined (smart and feature phones) only in late 2011 (but keep in mind there were no feature phones running android).

          • Danny Davis

            I won't argue about it's growth compared to Symbian. Cause Symbian and Meego was dead in water anyways. But when you look at against iOS, it was no where near close til the last year or so. Even in 2010, with 33 million users, the apps were long and distant from being on the OS. But you're right, I won't argue the fasting growing. But it took them 4 years to gain dominance.

          • Cristi13

            Well I'm glad that we agree. Wp is now in a more difficult position than android or iOS were, they were capitalizing on symbian's decline, an is that was in a really poor state. Nowadays is very hard for wp simply because both iOS and android are in a good position, continuing to improve, adding new features. Wp doesn't have enough reasons for people to switch, especially if they already invested in their platform and I don't think that there are so many that are willingly to switch just for the sake of change, when they are already satisfied (and don't have time or money). Don't get me wrong, I wish ms and especially to Nokia good luck but I think we're moving towards a monopoly just like on the PC market (especially with android currently at 74%).

  • GlennStile

    I'll stick to quickoffice and kingsoft

  • aasifaalamkhan

    can somebody tell me which keyboard app that is in the first image?

    http://cdn.androidpolice.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/nexusae0_unnamed-3_thumb26.png

    • http://revanmj.pl/ Michał Jakubowski

      I thinks it's keyboard that Samsung preinstalls on TouchWiz ROMs.

      • http://www.androidpolice.com/ Artem Russakovskii

        That is correct.

  • Zak Taccardi

    So, this is useless if you don't use skydrive then?

    • Eric Anderson

      Does Google Docs let you save to Dropbox or Skydrive? Stupid question.

      • Zak Taccardi

        Google Docs is free. I am a paying Microsoft Office 365 customer. Microsoft office for Android is a separate app, it could easily load a file from Google drive just like it currently does from SkyDrive, there's no difference.

        Because it loads a static file and does not provide it's own real time cloud editing, Dropbox, Google drive, or any other cloud support would be easy to achieve.

  • Eric Anderson

    Just purchased as a student. It was only $79 for 4 years - not bad at all! Not to mention the mobile app is so far above Google Drive it's not even funny (that pains me to say so!). Overall, I'm upset that it won't work on my Note 10.1, but I'm happy to have more options and to find a great deal for students.

    • PhoenixPath

      Yep. Will be great for us Corp or Edu users already on or considering a 365 subscription.

  • Dalian barons

    What I really want to know is what happens on the 29th of February, does it just shut down or what?

  • Matthew Fry

    Yay! Maybe some competition will get Google to do something.

  • jOn Garrett

    why is this needed when there are plenty of apps that do the same thing., for FREE.

  • http://www.modminecraft.com/ Nick Coad

    Office 365 costs $120/year in Australia, what an absolute rip-off.

  • Rand Dom