13
Jun
unnamed (2)

In case you hadn't heard, Google Reader will be mercilessly and permanently shut down in just over two weeks. It's kind of a big deal. Not just because of the millions of readers who actively use it, but because of the services that rely on Reader as a backend for their own platforms. Press, a popular reader launched on Android with some fanfare back in December, is now preparing for the Readerpocalypse. In addition to syncing with Google Reader, Press now works with popular paid alternatives Feed Wrangler and Feedbin.

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To sync your Press subscriptions, favorites, and what have you with Feed Wrangler or Feedbin, just log into the other services once the app starts up. (Both of them are paid subscription web apps, by the way - if you're looking for a free successor to Google Reader, look elsewhere.) The developers of Press also say that official support for Feedly (which is creating its own multi-platform alternative to the Google Reader API) and Fever, a.k.a. FeedaFever, will be coming soon.

The app also has a revamped look on phones, making it simpler and more efficient. The developers haven't itemized their changes, but based on a quick look, it does indeed seem more readable and usable on my 4.3" daily driver phone. All this is in addition to the huge list of additions from Version 1.2, including widgets, vertical and horizontal scrolling, and more sharing options. Press is available for Android 4.0 and up, and costs $2.99.

Google Reader dies on July 1st, ladies and gentlemen. Make sure that whatever service you switched to, you've exported and backed up your data before then.

Via TwentyFive Squares

What's in this version:

1.3.1
- Fixed incorrect dates
1.3
- Added Feedbin support
- Added Feed Wrangler support
- New, streamlined phone interface (check Settings for default behavior)
- UI refinements
- Several bug fixes and performance enhancements
- Feedly and Fever support coming soon!

Jeremiah Rice
Jeremiah is a US-based blogger who bought a Nexus One the day it came out and never looked back. In his spare time he watches Star Trek, cooks eggs, and completely fails to write novels.
  • Melvin

    Have we heard about what gReader will do? I thought they announced they have a plan, but haven't heard what it is.

    • jak_341

      I've heard nothing thus far. I did see an article on some Android website that the Feedly API alternative will support gReader. Perhaps that is the solution.

    • rmkbow

      They're working with feedly: "We are working with Feedly so that the app will work with the new Feedly service. You should be more patient. It will be published soon."

      https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/g_reader/yLRzT148670%5B1-25-false%5D

    • Rami

      gReader seems to be working with many solution, they already made a beta on the Google Groups forum with support of Tiny Tiny RSS.

  • Dinofan01

    Oddly enough the death of Reader has pushed me to adopt RSS feeds for the first time. I guess I want what I can't have? I'm happy with feedly as the backend but what app are people using/ expect to use? I believe most popular Reader apps are transitioning to feedly. I've heard good things about press. Any recommendations?

    • Rami

      I was also angry when Google announced they are closing Reader, but after finding TinyTinyRSS (self hosted php alternative to Reader) I am more satisfied now, as it supports plugins, that many user are making, and it works way better than original Reader or others.

  • cabbiebot

    $2.99 for this app? Not quite sold. There's still plenty of free options out there to try out as I search for my ideal Reader replacement. I am somewhat surprised they haven't adopted a freemium model to let people try out their app.

    • yale lawyer

      I am somewhat surprised you're so cheap.

      • cabbiebot

        That is asinine. I'm happy to pay for the full version of an app I like after giving it a free test run, but I'm not going to look twice at an app that wants me to pay out of the gate where my only recourse is a 15 minute refund window. Getting rid of the 24 hour refund period was one of the most misguided things Google has done with Android to date, IMO. I understand that some people were buying games, beating them, and refunding them in the 24 hour period but the correct answer was to allow developers to set their own refund window to avoid this.

  • Shaques

    I can recommend NewsBlur as a free alternative if you have less than 60 feeds. Not sure how their backend is set up though.

  • Chris

    I'm glad they released the second update today. After the update this morning, the time stamps said all my news articles had come from September of the year 45,219. I mean, as cool as it was to have news from 43,000 years in the future, I'm happy it's back to normal. :)

  • Rami

    I hope that they also add support for TinyTiny RSS, which I love.

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