15
Aug
afsmall
Last Updated: August 23rd, 2012

Have you ever seen a mind-blowing app that's sure to change the way you use Android... only to be discouraged by a $6.99 asking price? Or maybe one of your regular apps has updated and broken some core functionality, and you have to uninstall it and just wait for the next version. Now there's a service that will keep tabs on your somewhat neglected apps and convert it into an RSS feed for your favorite reader. AppFeed.net is free, easy and an absolute lifesaver if you're not in the habit of constantly checking the Google Play Store.

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First, log in to the service here, using your Google or Twitter account. Click the Applications tab on the top of the website, then add apps based on their Google Play Store page. Click My Feeds, and you'll appropriately bee given a choice of RSS and Atom feeds. Plug that link into Google Reader or your RSS reader of choice. Then sit back and wait for AppFeed to send you updates just as soon as they hit the store. Sure, it's a bit of a niche market, but those who need this kind of thing really need it (including more than one of your friendly neighborhood Android Police staff writers).

AppFeed.net

Jeremiah Rice
Jeremiah is a US-based blogger who bought a Nexus One the day it came out and never looked back. In his spare time he watches Star Trek, cooks eggs, and completely fails to write novels.
  • Joey Heck

    Thank you! I've wanted this for SO LONG

  • http://www.androidpolice.com/ Artem Russakovskii

    Definitely using the shit out of this.

  • http://codytoombs.wordpress.com/ Cody Toombs

    I swear, I just heard angels singing.

    I've been playing with the idea of building a web scraper just to point at Play Store pages for a long time. This just saved me so much time. Seriously, I have bookmarks for about 15-30 apps (lots of turnover in that list) that I open every few days just to check some detail about them. This makes that problem go away completely. Find me somebody who's hand I can shake for this, STAT!

  • Brady Rainey

    I am ALL ABOUT this ANDROID app watcher.

  • Dbareis

    Very good idea, much better than leaving non-working apps installed just so you can see when updates occur. I'm now using the RSS feeds. Needs to include revision history though.

  • Paul_Werner

    Or you can just use this so you can get the update notifications right on your device without the need to sign up for RSS

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.anod.appwatcher

    • http://pandu.poluan.info pepoluan

      Whoa! This looks much better than MarketMarks! I'll surely take it out for a spin! Thanks for the heads up!

    • http://pandu.poluan.info pepoluan

      I took it out for a spin, alright... Uninstalled for two reasons : No simple at-a-glance information on last update and/or price, and a worrying permission request.

      MarketMarks can do its job without such powerful permissions, why can't App Watcher?

      • Paul_Werner

        Yeah, I'm not sure actually. It says it needs that to sync with the Google Play store (and I'm assuming the account to know if the app you have is installed currently or not because it tells you if an app is installed or not when you add them)

        I did find that It's created by ALEX GAVRISHEV , who brought us Simple Calendar Widget. Not sure if that makes the permission setting any better but on the app page in the play store it says this in regards to permissions:

        "Remove AppWatcher synchronization account. AppWatcher synchronization moved under one of registered google accounts. (Removes permission that people were complaining about)"

        So I'm assuming he had another type of account to do this that people didn't like. Did you post on the app page as to why he has this permission?

  • e8genius

    Its huge!

  • http://pandu.poluan.info pepoluan

    I wish they made an app for that...

    • http://codytoombs.wordpress.com/ Cody Toombs

      In the mean time, I'm happy to approach it from a Unix-y way of combining tools to get something done. Hand the feed to Google Reader, then stick a feed-specific widget right on your home screen.

      I do agree with creating an app though; for three specific features:
      1) In-App management of the apps to watch. Going to the website on a mobile device is almost never ideal.

      2) Using the 'Share' intent from the market to directly hand the link to the app, which could pop a dialog and add the app directly to your list. This would make the process of adding an item virtually instantaneous.

      3) Configurable alerts that can pop directly to the status bar (in the case where certain apps deserve immediate attention).

    • Paul_Werner
  • ChumbleSpuzz

    This sure beats linking to apps in Evernote. My Android note is getting out of hand with just apps to track.

    • http://pandu.poluan.info pepoluan

      Have you tried "MarketMarks"? If your need is mostly 'bookmarking' apps instead of tracking app-prices, I'm sure you will love it :-)

      • ChumbleSpuzz

        No, I haven't. I'll take a look. Didn't realize this was a problem until reading about such tools. Looks like I could be able to track my installed/purchased apps and use it instead of navigating the Play Store's interface. If so, a definite plus then.

        • http://pandu.poluan.info pepoluan

          The first time around, you'll have to visit the Play Store, though; it needs you to 'share' the app to MarketMarks. But afterwards, all you have to do is to 'Check Updates' and it will inform you of last update + latest price. And don't forget to use its 'folders' to group the apps you're watching.

  • http://pandu.poluan.info pepoluan

    OMG... I suddenly realized after replying to @ChumbleSpuzz below, MarketMarks *can* pull in the prices and last update dates of apps you put in it! It's not automatic, though; you have to open it and tap on "Check Updates", but with its support of app grouping, that's an inconvenience I can live with.

    (Sorry I forgot the first time; had been busy modding my phone the past 3 weeks :P)

  • Samvith V Rao

    Insanely useful. Thanks AP!

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