27
May
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Last Updated: May 28th, 2012

Nearly two months ago, I reviewed the new SanDisk 64GB class 6 microSDXC (the XC stands for "eXtreme Capacity") card, and came away hugely impressed. Something the size of my pinky fingernail that can store 16 compressed 1080p BluRays, and outperforms my class 10 16GB card? Yes please.

Shortly after the card's release, the company followed up with a UHS-1 (Ultra High Speed-1) class 10 version. While the original class 6 version now rests at $72 - a substantial price drop from the $100 at the time of review - the UHS card costs just $118. At $100 for the C6, it was a questionable purchase from a value perspective; at $118 for the UHS-1, you're paying for a well-deserved premium for performance.

The benchmarks explain it better than words ever could. The 16GB class 10:

SC20120325-212736 SC20120325-212342 SC20120325-212447

The 64GB mSDXC, class 6:

SC20120325-215448 SC20120325-215114 SC20120325-215203

And the 64GB mSDXC UHS-1:

samsung gt-i9103 2012-05-26 23-26-09 samsung gt-i9103 2012-05-26 23-24-40 samsung gt-i9103 2012-05-26 23-25-20

Apologies for the difference in screenshot style - the same app was used, but while benchmarking the UHS1, I realized that you could save the image itself from in-app rather than taking a screenshot.

Read speeds - arguably the more important metric - are about 10% higher, and write speeds are about 70% higher. More impressively, initial speeds are massive, with writes starting around 24MB/s and reads starting at about 32MB/s before leveling off at the final speeds shown.

Despite the advertised Android support, the card wasn't supported by default, nor would my Win7 PC recognize it. In both cases, I would have to reformat in order to recognize the card, as was the case with the original. Thus, I'm not sure why they slapped the Android logo on there this time, doubly so since formatting the card (so that it works with Android and Windows) wipes the card, thereby removing the app they shipped on it. More of a quirk than anything, thankfully.

wm_IMG_0717

Ultimately, I still find local storage to be far superior to cloud storage. If you're in need of a large amount of microSD storage, take a long, hard look at both of SanDisk's 64GB microSDXC cards. The class 6 will be fast enough for the vast majority of users and at $72 is a reasonable value proposition. For those who require storage and uncompromising speed, though, the UHS1 card is well worth the purchase.

Aaron Gingrich
Aaron is a geek who has always had a passion for technology. When not working or writing, he can be found spending time with his family, playing a game, or watching a movie.

  • http://www.anivision.org/ Christopher Bailey (Xcom923)

    Funny thing is that u got a 32gb card when the price dropped for those before betting a transformer infinity but now I'm thinking I'll just have to get this now too.

  • Xajel

    What is the model number for it, I'm looking for a 16 or 32GB version but I can't find one.. only class 6...

  • Veridor

    Do any phones actually support SDXC cards yet, let alone UHS-1? Most only support 32 GB on their microSD slot, the upper limit of SDHC.

    • moelsen8

      that, and based on my research when buying my class 4 32gb, don't most phones start acting up when using cards above class 4 because the random write speeds approach zero?

      • Tommy Thompson

        I have a class 10 in my phone and it works perfectly.

    • AaronGingrich

      From my review of the Class 6 card: 

      "There's a second concern here beside speed, though: compatibility. See, not all devices support the microSDXC format. Newer gadgets should, but the more dated your tech, the less likely it is to support the standard. My Galaxy R (the Tegra 2 variant of the SGSII) supported things just fine (after I formatted the card via my phone's storage settings), as did the Prime (again, it didn't work until it was formatted properly), and we've heard accounts of mSDXC cards working in devices that reportedly don't support them. In other words, check your specs and purchase at your own risk."

      • Thomas

        The Standard is "backwards compatible" (Probably the wrong way of wording it), even if they don't support UHS-1 they will still support MicroSDXC if they support MicroSDHC.

        But it is of course possible that the support is broken by silly stuff like assuming that >32GB cards can't exist and so forth.

        • Hal Motley

          What about non-Android devices that use MicroSDs such as Nintendo DS flashcarts?

          Would the SuperCard DSTWO and Acekard 2i support the SDXC standard?

          • Thomas

            The principle is the same, it can work, unless there's a reason why it doesn't.

            For example my old noname card reader can't read my MicroSDXC card, but it can infact read it if i stickit in an SD Adapter.

            Likely the guys who programmed it at the time thought something like "Oh, well it's not like there's ever going to exist a 64GB MicroSD card, so we can safely assume they should be 32GB or less"

            Another thing you have to look out for is that these cards are preformatted exFAT, which may not be supported by your device, you would have to reformat the drive, but Windows won't allow you to create FAT32 volumes larger than 32GB, so you need to find a work around to that too (it's not a big deal, but needs some googling)

            So i can only recommend you find your answers from people who have those types of cards and see if they have the answer, i'm just saying if people would've done their work properly there isn't an card reader in the world capable of reading 32GB MicroSDHC cards that shouldn't be capable of reading the 64GB MicroSDXC cards either.

            But of course, we know the world doesn't work that way :(

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1745689461 Hal Motley

            (I know it sounds lame that I am replying to myself but that's a limitation of Disqus!)

            Thanks for your reply Thomas.
            I wouldn't use Windows for serious formating I use the GParted Linux application instead as it's substantially better and free!

            I will definitely ask the folks at GBATemp as they are very helpful and would be certainly more knowledgeable on the subject than you and I.

            Peace!

        • average joe

          i cant make much sense here... i have the sandisk version which is 64gb class 6 microsd XC for my galaxy note... will this 64gb class 10 microsd UH-1 also work in my galaxy note? and will it be faster in "ALL" cases or only faster at writing files but slower for general use of phone? (people say class 6 or under is faster for general phone use) very confusing to an average joe...please help

      • Veridor

        Thanks for the info.

  • Athishay

    Which app have you used for the benchmarks?

    • Hal Motley

      SD Tools was used in both of the MicroSD benchmarks.

      SD Tools - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ales.veluscek.sdtools&hl=en

  • g8rzz187
  • Admiral Ackbar

    My 64GB mSDXC UHS-1 write speed is around 6 MB/s ??

    • Admiral Ackbar

       Update: Transferring files from my computer I get 6MB/s but doing a internal speed test I get 11.5MB/s.

  • Nklenchik

    The 64GB SGS III isn't a rumor, right...like that's actually happening? That plus this would be amazing

    • http://www.androidpolice.com/ Artem Russakovskii

      Not a rumor, but we've yet to see an SGS III above 16GB in real life.

    • TruthHurtz

      Few phones support SDXC - Samsung Galaxy S3 (All Versions +Intl) DOES SUPPORT IT

      Here's a List I Quickly Made/Put Together, taking info from PA

      Does my SmartPhone ACTUALLY SUPPORT SDXC Cards? (At least 64GB Size)

      Sammy Galaxy S3 - Yes Supported

      LG Optimus 3D - Not Supported

      Sammy Note - Not Supported

      HTC Amaze 4G - Not Supported

      Sammy Galaxy S2 - Not Supported

      Motorola Razor Maxx - Not Supported

      Motorola Droid 4 - Not Supported

      Sony Xperia T - Not Supported (As of yet)

      NO Micro SD SLOT Available:

      Samsung Galaxy Nexus (All Versions)

      HTC One X

      HTC One S

      HTC One V

      Some Tablets do take SDXC - Continue the Research :)

      Hope this Helps..

      Best

  • Tyler Chappell

    My 32GB Sandisk Class 4 in my Thunderbolt consistently gets about 5MB/s write and 19MB/sec read speeds

  • Xpatriot720x

    What are the random speeds of the class 10 vs the class 6

  • Coolgamefreak

    Hey but how many phones out there support a 64 gig card?

    • Magnus100

      Pretty much every Android phone (Not sure about the throw away phones though, I'd stay away from them anyway and stick with the high end phones)

    • Magnus100

      Pretty much every Android phone (Not sure about the throw away phones though, I'd stay away from them anyway and stick with the high end phones)

  • CeluGeek

    I'm wary of repeating the history of using 8 GB cards on devices claiming support for up to 4 GB cards. Back then some 8 GB cards worked fine, others wouldn't work at all and others worked for reading files but got corrupted when you tried to save files to them.

    What are the chances of a 64 GB card actually working reliably on current devices designed for up to 32 GB cards?

    • GigiAUT

      Same thing I'm asking.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Lentrice-Wilson/100000303237497 Lentrice Wilson

       Since I've been using mine for approximately 3 months now I'd say good very good.

  • Brfield

    http://www.cellphoneshop.net/64microsdxc.html  $89.99
    Use Coupon Code: "MODMY12" to remove 20% 
    $4.99 Shipping
    Total: 76.98

  • Brfield
    • Brfield

      Whoops, looks like I read that wrong, it's a class 6. 

  • Brfield
  • warcaster

    I hope Android devices (especially the tablets) will start supporting these 64 GB microSD cards, soon.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/7GU4N7CVDBJXMZOBFO3DMIQZH4 J

      I also would love it if Android manufacturers switched to SDXC cards.  Though, FYI, if they did switch to SDXC devices, rather than supporting cards "up to 32GBs", the devices could support up to 2TBs.  Obviously they're not that large *yet*, but switching could place a larger demand on bigger cards, encouraging quicker development of even larger cards, getting us, eventually, to affordable 2TB microSD cards.  

      If I had a 2TB card, I could basically have with me 24/7 every file and a portable version of the programs installed on my desktop.  Then if I find myself with some free time on campus, I could just log into any random computer, mount the phone's SD card to the computer, launch the portable-ized Visual Studios .net & finish my programming assignment, or launch portable Word to work on my research paper & have all my sources handy on the card as well...  No worries about having a connection to the cloud to download the files (or if I'm blowing through my bandwidth cap) either, since its all locally stored.  Plus I'd be able to access it a lot faster (no waiting for the down/up load).

      Or I could use it when cloud storage just wouldn't work.  While visiting family during the holidays, for example, I'm frequently asked for tech support.  With a 2TB card, I could always just copy all of my cousin's files from his 500GB hard drive to my phone, reformat his virus/malware riddled computer & then restore his files (after ensuring they're malware free of course)...  Or I could take a copy of the multi-GB footage (too large to fit into my Google Drive account + I wouldn't want to try to upload it on his dialup or my 3G connection) he filmed while we were exchanging gifts to convert to a DVD...

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/7GU4N7CVDBJXMZOBFO3DMIQZH4 J

    So reading the comments, apparently some phones are lucky enough to be able to support the 64GB SDXC card (even though all (as far as I know) claim to only support up to 32GBs)...  Any chance there might be a list going somewhere of devices that are able to support it?  I'm sure my Droid X is out of the question (likely too old), but if I had a list of devices that were known to either support or not support it, it could help figuring out what I want to replace it with when the time comes...

    • TruthHurtz

      Few phones support SDXC - Samsung Galaxy S3 (All Versions +Intl) DOES SUPPORT IT
      Here's a List I Quickly Made/Put Together, taking info from PA

      Does my SmartPhone ACTUALLY SUPPORT SDXC Cards? (At least 64GB Size)

      Sammy Galaxy S3 - Yes Supported

      LG Optimus 3D - Not Supported
      Sammy Note - Not Supported
      HTC Amaze 4G - Not Supported
      Sammy Galaxy S2 - Not Supported
      Motorola Razor Maxx - Not Supported
      Motorola Droid 4 - Not Supported
      Sony Xperia T - Not Supported (As of yet)

      NO Micro SD SLOT Available:
      Samsung Galaxy Nexus (All Versions)
      HTC One X
      HTC One S
      HTC One V

      Some Tablets do take SDXC - Continue the Research :)
      Hope this Helps..

      Best

  • Ajoe

    anybody care to answer on here?? i cant make much sense here... i have the sandisk version which is 64gb
    class 6 microsd XC for my galaxy note... will this 64gb class 10 microsd
    UH-1 also work in my galaxy note? and will it be faster in "ALL" cases
    or only faster at writing files but slower for general use of phone?
    (people say class 6 or under is faster for general phone use) very
    confusing to an average joe...please help

  • Ezio Auditore da Firenze

    Does anybody know if the sony ericsson xperia neo v supports sdxc cards?

    • Mafate2007

      Good question! Any answer??

  • Brfield

    Just received my Class 10 UHS-1 64GB today, insanely fast. Writes of 10-12 MB/s, Reads averaging 30 MB/s with bursts of 50 MB/s+

  • Luc Mai

    I recently bought a 64gb micro SDXC card for my SG2 Epic Touch and it states that its only 32GB, I tried reformatting, partitioning, and even plugging into a laptop with an adapter, still says 32gb, Compatibilty issue or just rare bad luck with a mislabeled card?

  • CellPhoneEngine
  • SMUSSIL

    My Huawei Honour/Honor does not recognize the
    SanDisk's 64GB microSDXC.
    What's wrong?

  • Beth

    Having a lot of trouble finding any program that I can download onto Windows 7 in order to format the microsdxc1 (class 10) in order to use it in my android Galaxy S2 - all programmes I've tried pop up with "need administrator rights" and don't let me open it. The laptop recognised the card but can only format to NTFS which the phone doesn't recognise....Any help or is it a lost cause??? Thanks vv much

  • mchan1

    64Gb SDXC card currently sells ~$60USD.
    There are some reports by owners, including self, on various forums that the card do have quality issues due to corruption.
    I had to send mine back to get it replaced with a new one.
    Also, the Galaxy Tab 7+ won't recognize it without it being reformatted to Fat32 which is unfortunate as it's defaulted to exFat by Scandisk.
    Too bad Android (for the Tablet) doesn't recognize NTFS.

  • Timothy Takemoto

    My Sandisk SDXC 64GB card from ebay (<50USD) works perfectly in my NEC Medias Tab N-08D, but my computer can't read it, when the card is inserted in the SDHC slot, nor when connected by USB (2) to the tablet. There is driver software from Windows
    http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=4247
    but when I attempt to install it, I am told that it is not suitable for my Windows 7 64bit computer. I wanted to use my phone in place of a flash drive but I can't access it from windows. If I could somehow format it as FAT32, which is what I was told I would have to do to get my tablet to read the card, perhaps by installing a mini linux

    http://gparted.sourceforge.net/livecd.php and the using a linux based formatter that might help? Any other suggestions gratefully received. Perhaps I need a new computer, or a PCI based USB port.

  • Wes

    So does it work on Android?