22
May
unnamed

Going above and beyond their promise to save "time and annoyance" when screening, placing, or receiving calls, CallApp recently released their namesake app (a TechCrunch Disrupt 2012 finalist) to Google's Play Store.

CallApp – in what may be the biggest understatement of the week – bills itself as a "super caller ID," increasing call productivity with a set of handy interactive tools and quick informational displays for everyone that calls (or initiates a call with) you. The app pulls information from various services, including Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin, Foursquare and even your calendar or email, searching for the most relevant and timely info for each caller.

Functionality

One of the great things about CallApp is that it not only pulls information about the entity on the other end of a call, but can be connected (at your discretion) to your own personal LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Foursquare, and Email accounts to show information including mutual friends, shared emails, or other things that connect you to the person who is calling you.

What's better, the app recognizes not only people, but businesses as well, pulling up reviews, locations, business hours, and links for Yelp, Streetview, Facebook, and more.

At the user's discretion, CallApp can also announce who is calling, show a post-call screen for an adjustable timeframe, and a lot more.

SC20120521-214408 SC20120521-223915 SC20120521-224638

The app also delivers a ton of in-call functionality, allowing users to take notes, set timers, create meetings, and share things like links, contacts, and even apps or location information with the person on the other end of the call (assuming that person is also using CallApp). Users can also communicate with callers via Google Talk or Skype, or send a "wink."

SC20120521-215123 SC20120521-221133 Screenshot_2012-05-22-01-16-10

You may be wondering what happens when CallApp isn't sure about its information. The creators have that covered too – the app will place a small question mark next to any uncertain information, and allows users to verify that information, making suggestions if the info is not correct.

image Untitled-4

Those wondering about CallApp's battery footprint (it pulls a lot of data, after all) will be interested to know that the app only pulls some of its information on demand, caching the rest locally. Some data can even be pre-loaded when your device is connected to Wi-Fi and charging.

Privacy/Permissions

Functionally, it's clear that CallApp is incredibly powerful, and it works as smoothly as anyone could want. It's worth mentioning though that CallApp requires tons of permissions to run. Of particular concern is an option called "CallApp Plus," which promises additional features and "millions of caller IDs." In return, the app will store and "verify" your entire contact list.

SC20120521-212852

The app is vague (as is CallApp's Privacy Statement) on what it will do to "verify" contacts, but considering the fact that the app has permission to send SMS messages without notifying the user, we recommend not enabling the "Plus" features just yet. We have reached out to CallApp about this concern, and will update this post pending a reply.

Update 5/21/12: CallApp has responded, assuring us that the app in no way contacts the people in your contact list, but instead simply uploads their name and phone number to CallApp's servers. Marketing Director Gilad Bechar explains:

CallApp does not verify your contacts. NO ONE IN YOUR CONTACT LIST WILL BE CONTACTED BY CALLAPP IN ANYWAY. The wording is inaccurate and will be changed accordingly in our next version. What the text should convey is that CallApp will upload the user's contacts to CallApp's Universal Contact Book. The user can uncheck Enable CallApp Plus during the registration phase if they do not want to share their contact book. Note that it means that you will get less results and less features.

CallApp's Privacy Statement also reserves the right to "share Personal Information … to let our partners and affiliates serve you with commercials." It isn't exactly clear what this means, but it is important to note that the possibility for targeted advertisement is there.

That being said, the app's other permissions seem logical, given the extremely wide range of functionality it has to offer. Those concerned about the app's other permissions can take a look at the handy explanations on CallApp's website.

Update by Artem 5/22/12: I asked CallApp some more questions, and here's what they had to say (question in italics, answers in regular font):

1. Your privacy policy clearly says that you're sharing info with advertisers for the purposes of delivering commercials. Can you explain your business model and detail this point please? Are we to expect ads in the app itself? Telemarketing calls and emails? There are lots of privacy implications here.

Our privacy policy was built but our VC's lawyers and we will change it and make it more clear. We will never share our users personal details with anyone! We will however, in the future, will be able to add some personal advertising. let's say that someone has just tried to order a reservation in a restaurant and it was full, we can give this user 5 more recommended restaurants near by so he can call them in just one tap. We will never sell our information to no one else!

At the moment, we are getting paid for each user who enter YELP from our app so that's another model as well and this is our direction of monetize it.

2. Is there a plan for a much more privacy-conscious app that you charge for, for example?

The privacy is very important for us and we will never break the privacy code otherwise we won't have a right to exist. We have no plans about what you suggested. We want to make this app much more awesome and it will be free like Facebook, Twitter etc.

3. Where are the auth tokens for social networks specifically stored - on the device or on your servers? Are they protected in any way?

All the social information is stored locally on the device and not in our servers! That means that if you uninstall the app and reinstall it again, you will have to insert your social users&passwords all over again.

4. How long did it take you to develop CallApp, as to me it already looked like a mature product with many smarts built in. I love it. How big is the team and where are you based?

The app was developed for about a year and a half with the best team in the world. We are based in Tel-Aviv, Israel, and our CTO is Amit On, the former CTO of Amobee who were sold earlier this year with $ 320M.

At the moment we are a team of 8 and this is our first live version. We are planning to add tones of new exiting features but we wanted to launch in TC so we had launched it without everything that we planned. There is a lot more coming soon :)

Interface

Overall, CallApp's interface is fairly intuitive. The app is clearly modeled after the stock Ice Cream Sandwich dialer, but the dialer looks like a slightly mutated variant, with additional search and quick-access elements. The in-call screen, while usable, has a jam-packed menu bar at the bottom which – in my opinion – has a bit too much going on in too small a space.

That being said, the rest of the call screen is actually quite useful, and really provides the bulk of CallApp's useful functionality – mutual contacts are listed on the right side of the screen, while information from various social services appears below the caller's photo. Your contact's name runs along the top in bold text, next to buttons that allow users to easily communicate with each other through various means.

CallApp's menu is fairly easy to navigate, allowing users to connect additional services in a snap, and control options for contact, action, and incoming call screens.

Untitled-7 Screenshot_2012-05-22-01-04-59 Screenshot_2012-05-22-13-03-54

In the end, CallApp's interface works well – it's easy to navigate, gives users just about all the information they could ever want at once, and – while certain aspects aren't gorgeous – it's downright usable.

Final Thoughts

Overall, CallApp is easily the best app I've encountered in months. It brings functionality that I've been searching for since getting my first Android phone, and after playing with it for a while, I can't help but feel like this is what telephony on a smartphone was supposed to be.

While its "Plus" functionality still sounds a little fishy, the rest of the app is undoubtedly awesome, and definitely worth checking out. At the price of $0.00, there's absolutely no reason not to give it a try.

Thanks, OptionalSocks!

Liam Spradlin
Liam loves Android, design, user experience, and travel. He doesn't love ill-proportioned letter forms, advertisements made entirely of stock photography, and writing biographical snippets.

  • http://www.androidpolice.com/ Artem Russakovskii

    This is an absolutely fantastic app. I've been checking out various caller-id apps over the last 2 years, and this one is not only miles ahead of them, but it's also done very-veyr right, doesn't nag with upgrades, and pulls so much useful info that I was just shocked.

    When I called a local Walgreens #, it displayed its hours of operation and address, all by recognizing the phone # and with no other hints. One click and I'm on Google Maps. And I know it's open. Effing brilliant.

    Did the same thing with Comcast's 1-800 number - not only it showed me working hours, but also displayed a helpful review that said how much Comcast sucks. Well, now I know it works.

    Little things are done very right too - if you're trying to share location but the other person doesn't have CallApp installed, it detects it and pops up a pre-filled SMS message instead. Otherwise, it immediately prompts to open Maps on the other end and an ability to share location back. Needless to say, this went on the wife's phone immediately.

    I do have privacy concerns, and we've reached out to CallApp about them. For instance, I'm still afraid to enable the free Plus that "stores and verifies" contacts. Not sure what that does, but I sure hope it doesn't spam them all individually.

    All in all, right now CallApp is an app of the year for me. It doesn't cease to amaze after hours of playing with it.

    • numpty

      Presumably you also knew it was open because they answered the phone when you called them.

      • http://www.androidpolice.com/ Artem Russakovskii

        Well, actually an automated system answered but I immediately knew whether they were open or not. More importantly, I actually called outside of business hours, so knowing exactly when they're open was even more valuable.

    • UmangKedia

      But FB connect is not working for me! Only twitter and G+

  • Bomberlt

    Hmm.. So it's like wp address book but with more mess in it?

  • http://twitter.com/Telanis_ Telanis

    Some of this seems like it would be useful post-call.  It just seems cluttered and confusing when answering, and unless you put them on speaker you can't use it during the call without being a tool.

  • Wittmer85

    It says in the privacy policy they will provide your personal information to their partners/affiliates.  basically meaning that they will sell your information and as a result you may notice more SPAM phone calls and other types of SPAM.

    See for yourself
    http://www.callapp.com/privacy/ 

    Section 5: Sharing Personal Information with third parties
    Line: (i) to let our partners and affiliates serve you with commercials. 

    • http://www.droid-den.com Rachid

      "serve you with commercials"

      I took that to mean ads within the app? That's generally what serve means isn't it?

      • Wittmer85

        I didn't get past the initial start up screen because is saw that line.  Can anyone confirm that the app does show adds to the user while it is in use? If it does then Rachid I believe you may be correct then.  

        • http://www.droid-den.com Rachid

          I didn't try it myself :P 

          That's just an assumption though, even if it doesn't show ads now it might be there to cover that as a possibility in the future. 

          I guess the only people who can tell us for sure are the devs :/

        • http://www.androidpolice.com/ Artem Russakovskii

          It does not show any ads.

    • http://www.androidpolice.com/ Artem Russakovskii

      Indeed, you're right. I don't think they have any partners yet, but this may change in the future. I already get plenty of spam, which Google takes care of nicely, so I think while there is a potential that my information will be getting shared with future partners, I think the upside outweighs that at the moment, at least for me. We'll see how it goes. I mean, free is free - they have to reserve some language for a future business plan, though I wish these guys were different, as pretty much every caller id app out there does the same to your info.

  • AhChoo

    this service entirely depends on how many people are willing to share their social contact info publicly around the web. I think they made a correct decision in going free but it does bring the issue of privacy and how much public is willing to give it up nowadays. 

    While I think having your info displayed publicly is creepy, I do think the dialer's recognition of business number and info is awesome.

    • http://www.androidpolice.com/ Artem Russakovskii

      I think you'd be surprised how much information about people who aren't connected to you ends up surfacing through their sharing it on social networks (and not with the CallApp or you specifically).

      • AhChoo

        im not surprised, i agree with you that our information is already out there for everyone to see. I just think mass public takes their privacy for granted, for better or worse

      • http://codytoombs.wordpress.com/ Cody Toombs

        There is a devine hint in reading this article only 5 minutes after I got a call from a tech recruiter (read: headhunters) I worked with years ago who's number didn't match my contact list.

        On a not entirely unrelated subject...CallApp, PLEASE LET ME PAY FOR THIS INSTEAD OF SELLING MY INFO TO ADVERTISERS OR PUSHING ADS ON ME!!!!!!!

        Regarding Privacy: (why I replied in this spot)
        The subject came up very heavily back when Path fell under a ton of scrutiny for uploading each iPhone user's entire contact list with full details.  Within days it was widely acknowledged that tons of developers do this (even Rovio of Angry Birds fame does it).At this stage of the game, the only way you can protect your personal info (name, phone number, address, email) is to not give it to anybody you know who's got a smartphone.  In a way, it's not the apps you install that you have to worry about, it's the apps that EVERYBODY you know installs.  This isn't just an issue on smartphones either, it's a supremely common practice with Facebook (and if you've looked at the API, it's stupid easy if you can get a user to accept the permissions).  Contact information isn't secret and never will be again.  Other information, that may be a different story...but that's why we care about our phones being more secure in the first place.

  • Andy

    Another concern is data usage.  Obviously it needs a good data connection to get the initial info.  I end up reading the info more than picking up the phone.  :)  Fun info on the caller's latest tweet, title, message...etc.  And, I would like to how much data this app is grabbing and uploading to their server.  I've seen a few times that my phone is idling but a data is being used/synced.

    • http://www.androidpolice.com/ Artem Russakovskii

      I'd like to know this as well. How often is sync done, what is getting synced and stored on the server and what isn't, where the auth tokens are stored - on devices or their servers, etc. So far at least the app isn't showing up at all in the battery stats, which is a good sign.

      • Andy

         Hum, my shows it uses CPU total of 47 min, CPU foreground 4m52s and stay awake 2m25s.  So far it uses 20% of battery usage, but I've been testing a lot of its function.  It's really neat and grabbed a bunch of images/data from various callers.  I would rate it 4 stars atm...but still very concern about the privacy issue.  Posted the question on their G+, but they haven't responded yet.

        • http://www.androidpolice.com/ Artem Russakovskii

          If you used it a lot, that's probably where the CPU time is coming from, but from casual use it doesn't show up in my battery stats.

          I've also dispatched a few more questions to them, let's see what they say.

    • Andy

      One other thing I found is that it's not a total caller app replacement because there's no way for you to edit any previously stored caller info.

      • Test

        press on the name to edit - that simple :)

  • Andrew

    For 'unknown callers', I wonder how this app will compare to using the "Mr Number" app?

  • http://twitter.com/MrBouche MrBouche

    I would love an alternate dailer.  Sense seemed to dumb down the opportunity for a decent dailer in ICS, which I find disappointing. That being said, I would not give up my information or my contacts information for one.  Not even if they promised the most innocent of intentions.  They should just make a paid version and promise privacy, I would probably purchase it; otherwise, I'm not interested.

    • Wittmer85

      I agree with MrBouche a more sound business plan would be to have a free app where the personal information could be distributed and a paid app where personal information is kept confidential.  

  • Dipish

    The guy tells about SMS in his talk. If you share something (e.g. your location) with a persion that doesn't have CallApp, he will get a text from you with a link (not sure if it's a link to Google Maps or app download)

    • http://www.androidpolice.com/ Artem Russakovskii

      It's a link to Google Maps. I talked about this feature in my comment earlier.

  • Paas

    They should have a opt-out function!
    I do NOT want the person I call to see my twitter or facebook messages or even ID for that matter.
    I use the same phone number for business and personal calls. My twitter, facebook and other things are strictly personal, I don't want any business contacts seeing those.

    • squiddy20

      "They should have a opt-out function!" ...otherwise known as choosing not to use the app.
      "I do NOT want the person I call to see my twitter or facebook messages or even ID for that matter" They won't if they don't have the app...

      • Petie

        YOU might not use the application, but if someone who has you on their contact list uses it, how do you opt-out of that?   That is where the real privacy problems come in, IMHO.

        • squiddy20

          I imagine the same way you would opt out of having your home phone number in the White Pages (unlisted), your entire Facebook profile (pictures and all) available for everyone to see (or not), or any mention of your name in a Google search. If people really wanted to find out info on "the real you", it wouldn't be all that hard. This app just makes it that much easier.
          Let's face it, privacy as we knew it is going down the tubes. Not even 15 years ago, Google didn't even exist. With the advent of Google (as well as Whitepages.com and the like), you can now type in anyone's name and find at least some shred of info about them. How is that any different from this app? At least with this app, there has to be some kind of connection between you and the other person for you to be in their contact list or vice versa.

          • http://codytoombs.wordpress.com/ Cody Toombs

            I'm just saying this for the sake of getting people thinking (and it just naturally fits with what you just said).  People need to first understand the meaning of privacy.

            - It's not a privacy issue if somebody can look up your account on Facebook or Twitter to see something you've posted publicly.
            - It's not a privacy issue if your phone number is available in public record (any primary business number or any residential landline that hasn't been de-listed).
            - It's not a privacy issue if people in your contact list can get something that you've posted that should be visible to them (even if you don't realize it is).

            It feels creepy, but ultimately...
            - It's not a privacy issue when they can see something posted publicly even if they aren't on that network.
            - It's not a privacy issue if a standard search on Google using either your phone number or CallerID turns up more info on you.

            Every single thing related to social network posts in that list can be solved by not posting things publicly, only posting things to people you are sure you want to see them, or not posting private stuff at all.  The others can be solved by making sure your phone number is de-listed (somehow that can be done on cell numbers too).

            Things become privacy issues when you're getting information that can ONLY be found through another person's contact list, it's information only available with permissions that are otherwise unavailable to a given person, or it's data obtained through services that aren't available to the general public (paid services seem like a gray area).

            As many others have said...if you don't want it out there, don't post it.  I have personally started asking myself with almost everything I post if I'd like to be judged by it publicly in the future (even private messaging friends doesn't ensure they won't print it out and share it with CNN, just ask Anthony Weiner).

            My advice to everybody who's feeling paranoid about privacy issues like this...either start researching and learning how to hide everything about yourself that you want private, or just relax and enjoy the few good sides that come with your personal details becoming personalized profiles.  People have to give in to the idea that 'security by obscurity' no longer works in our personal lives.

            Hmm, this feels like a good blog post...I might have to write up something longer next week after I submit an app update.

  • Freak4Dell

    Doesn't seem worth it. I'm not interested in most of that clutter anyway, and I don't really want to share my contact list. I usually don't care at all about privacy, but this just seems a bit over the top, even for me.

    My friends are free to call me whenever they like, and they'll understand if I can't pick up, because I'll explain why when I call them back. If a call comes in from a number I don't recognize, 99% of the time, I just ignore the call, whether I'm free or not. If it's important, they'll leave a voicemail. If they don't, I didn't want to waste my time talking to them in the first place. I'd rather stick with my current method than use an app that does who knows what with my contact list and sucks down data to provide me with stuff I really don't care about in the first place.

    • http://www.androidpolice.com/ Artem Russakovskii

      See, I kind of agree with you, and it also depends on what you do as for business it could be quite valuable. I personally found it more valuable for placing phone calls to new numbers, like stores or customer service, and getting info about those. Also, using it as a location sharing app with my wife - it's very simple and kind of won me over. I'm sure there are other ways of achieving the same, but so far I'm satisfied.

      • Freak4Dell

        I'll agree with you there. It's got some potential for businesses. I wouldn't mind having those features for when I call businesses, but the rest of it just kind of puts me off for some reason.

      • http://www.facebook.com/nelson.jaimesp Nelson Jaimes P

        exactly what I´m using it for

  • Not enough minerals

    not digging it. i'm not really a "sharing" person, i don't want people to automatically know stuff i don't want them to know about me.

    • Val

      It is concerning that even if I don't share my contact list, some of my contacts can share THEIR contact list which could include me, then getting targeted by 3rd parties. Or I am wrong on this? 

  • Martin Nilsson

    About the "plus" feautre, I might have an idea what it does. I use the app TrueCaller as a caller ID, which works great btw, and it has a similar feature. You give them access to your contacts and they then share that information with your friends. If you know Ben and Ben has an unlisted number and your other friend Ted gets a phonecall from Ben, the number won't show up. But since you have Ben's "secret" phone number, they will display your information about Ben to Ted. I'm not using the feature out of privacy concerns, but it is still pretty clever!

  • http://www.androidpolice.com/ Artem Russakovskii

    I asked CallApp some more questions, and here's what they had to say:

    1. Your privacy policy clearly says that you're sharing info with
    advertisers for the purposes of delivering commercials. Can you explain
    your business model and detail this point please? Are we to expect ads
    in the app itself? Telemarketing calls and emails? There are lots of
    privacy implications here.

    Our privacy policy was built but our VC's lawyers and we will change it
    and make it more clear. We will never share our users personal details
    with anyone! We will however, in the future, will be able to add some
    personal advertising. let's say that someone has just tried to order a
    reservation in a restaurant and it was full, we can give this user 5
    more recommended restaurants near by so he can call them in just one
    tap. We will never sell our information to no one else!

    At the moment, we are getting paid for each user who enter YELP from our
    app so that's another model as well and this is our direction of
    monetize it.

    2. Is there a plan for a much more privacy-conscious app that you charge for, for example?

    The privacy is very important for us and we will never break the privacy
    code otherwise we won't have a right to exist. We have no plans about
    what you suggested. We want to make this app much more awesome and it
    will be free like Facebook, Twitter etc.

    3. Where are the auth tokens for social networks specifically stored -
    on the device or on your servers? Are they protected in any way?

    All the social information is stored locally on the device and not in
    our servers! That means that if you uninstall the app and reinstall it
    again, you will have to insert your social users&passwords all over
    again.

    4. How long did it take you to develop CallApp, as to me it already
    looked like a mature product with many smarts built in. I love it. How
    big is the team and where are you based?

    The app was developed for about a year and a half with the best team in
    the world. We are based in Tel-Aviv, Israel, and our CTO is Amit On, the
    former CTO of Amobee who were sold earlier this year with $ 320M.

    At the moment we are a team of 8 and this is our first live version. We
    are planning to add tones of new exiting features but we wanted to
    launch in TC so we had launched it without everything that we planned.
    There is a lot more coming soon :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=618059324 Nelson Jaimes

    1. "Some data can even be pre-loaded when your device is connected to Wi-Fi and charging. " .. Is that any configurable? Would be nice have the option for cached updates  over wifi twiace a day or so and on demand updates (or not)..2. What exactly do we "lose" by not activating the PLUS?

    3.Definitively should be a paid option for using PLUS without sharing my contact list (I'm assuming that based on my contact list other user may be able to have a caller ID even on my bussiness contacts private numbers..not nice)

  • http://www.facebook.com/michael.wasserman1 Michael Wasserman

    won't download to ATT Galaxy note....wassup with that?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=618059324 Nelson Jaimes

     on the app description in Google Play: "Enriches your phonebook with the latest contact & social info/pictures even if you are not connected to that person via social networks" ..Does that mean that if a person I´m in social network contact to share its contact book, and I´m in that contact book.. any person with CallApp will be have acces to my information (like profile photo and statuses updates) ????

    • Gilad

      Hey Nelson, 
      Your social information that is displayed to other people is subjected to the restrictions and permissions that you have defined in your account in each social network you are subscribed to. For instance, if your Facebook profile is only accessible by your friends on Facebook, then only they will see your profile information when accessing your contact in CallApp.

      If you have a picture in one of your social networks, and it's a public picture so anyone who searches you can find, it will be shown in our app.Gilad Bechar
      CallApp Marketing Director

      • http://codytoombs.wordpress.com/ Cody Toombs

        Unless I've misunderstood, it's the phone that queries the social networks, never your servers.  Since the phone only has credentials for the user, it can only get information the user already can get.  If this is accurate, it suggests you'll never see anything that is private (truly private) through this app, and conversely none of your data that is correctly set to be private will be visible to other people (unless they already had permission to view it).  Is any of that incorrect?  I'm asking less for myself and more for other people, I think this will clear it up for people who are still confused about the "chain of custody" (that's what I'm gonna call it).

        I do have a few questions for myself.
        If I'm getting a call from somebody who isn't in my contact list, or they are but I haven't added them as a friend on any social network yet...and the phone number is/is-not visible to me on a social network...in what scenarios will CallApp be able to pull up information from a social network if there's not an existing connection?

        Can CallApp find somebody I'm not connected to but plausible to get that information, perhaps they have a publicly visible phone number on facebook?  How?

        Are there ever a time that information from other people is used to make those connections for me.  For example, 100 different contact lists (from other people) say that some phone number belongs to some person; now that person calls me, will I now get ANY information, even if it's just the name of the caller?

        • Gilad

          Hey
          Cody, 

           

          About the
          first part, you are absolutely right.

           

          Regarding
          your questions:

          CallApp
          can try to look up the information in a lot of places. Let's say that we have
          the number (because he is calling you) and we search for it in yellow pages. By
          finding it there, we can know the person's name. By this name we can search
          Facebook / Twitter / etc. and find the most updated email address and from
          there it's pretty easy.

          I cannot
          say much further about our super smart search engine... There are times that CallApp
          won't show you any result but it's pretty rare.

           

          All the
          magic in CallApp Plus is that when your friends will allow it, we can get their
          contact information and give you more details about your mutual friends and
          their profile pictures. By knowing that, we can give you better results because
          our information will be much more accurate.

          Gilad Bechar
          CallApp Marketing Director

    • Test

      Only if he has permissions to see it on the web...

  • Rafaelmorales39

    I tried it and second what others have said. Security and functionality are paramount. It seems they have long ways to go... I like better ex dialer for its a superb addition to stock dialer. Plus, you can do fairly the same without the clutter feel

  • http://codytoombs.wordpress.com/ Cody Toombs

    @66877f004cafbc5a380ffdcb199fc0f7:disqus Hey, here's an idea I'd love to see integrated (if it's not already).  Please find a way to hook into the 800Notes database to determine spam callers.  I get an inordinately high number of bogus sales/spam calls and I'd love to see them put to an end.

  • http://twitter.com/jblumho Justin Blumhorst

    Anyone know why @Callapp is not in the play store now?

  • Aniruddha Das

    the google play link not working. has app been removed from google play ?? plz update ..

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