30
Dec
vzlogo

Earlier this week, Verizon announced that it would start charging customers a $2 fee for paying their bill with a debit card either online or over the phone. Naturally, this caused a huge uproar among customers -- sure, it's only a couple bucks, but it's the principal of the thing. Charging customer to pay their bill?  The very idea doesn't make sense. It's just whack.

So, after enormous customer backlash, guess what Verizon did? Changed its mind. The $2 fee was killed before it even started. Good call on Verizon's part, for sure -- but the real credit goes to everyone out there who decided to raise a voice a put a fist in the air.

December 30, 2011

Verizon Wireless has decided it will not institute the fee for online or telephone single payments that was announced earlier this week.

The company made the decision in response to customer feedback about the plan, which was designed to improve the efficiency of those transactions. The company continues to encourage customers to take advantage of the numerous simple and convenient payment methods it provides.

“At Verizon, we take great care to listen to our customers.  Based on their input, we believe the best path forward is to encourage customers to take advantage of the best and most efficient options, eliminating the need to institute the fee at this time,” said Dan Mead, president and chief executive officer of Verizon Wireless.

Cameron Summerson
Cameron is a self-made geek, Android enthusiast, horror movie fanatic, musician, and cyclist. When he's not pounding keys here at AP, you can find him spending time with his wife and kids, plucking away on the 6-string, spinning on the streets, or watching The Texas Chainsaw Massacre on repeat.

  • ocdtrekkie

    They were probably scared of the FCC investigation into the matter.

    • http://www.teamrou.com Phil Oakley

      Yeah, it probably helped!

  • http://www.teamrou.com Phil Oakley

    Nice one Verizon. Some of the things you do I don't like (like the extremely long time to release the Galaxy Nexus) but I do like this.

  • David Ruddock

    This was never going to go over well. I get where they were coming from on it, from a business standpoint, but it kind of unfairly targets people who may be lower income in the first place.

    • Fabulas

      Bingo, Sprint did this for years to lower income customers who IMHO were their bread and butter. Bad Karma!

  • http://www.vzw.com dcptcon

    Obvious PR stunt.
    "We listen to the customer"*
    *unless the customer wants unlimited data, unlocked bootloaders, family-plan data packages, or reliable replacement devices
    Still the best in the business by far, just saying though.

    • Elliott

      Not all of their phones have locked bootloaders, just the Motorola devices

  • Rob

    β€œAt Verizon, we take great care to listen to our customers. Based on their input, we believe the best path forward is to encourage customers to take advantage of the best and most efficient options, eliminating the need to institute the fee at this time,”

    TRANSLATION. "We pissed you off, and we're afraid you'll defect to a carrier that didn't come up with such a #STOOPID plan."

  • Carlos

    I think it's sites like yours that help get the word out! Great job. Keep up the good work!

  • Sam

    You are aware that you get this charge for non-DD (direct debit) payments in the UK (at least on T-Mobile)? Looks like UK customers need to be more vocal.. Or technically there's nothing that can be done from a legal standpoint.

  • L boogie

    Wasn't sure about verizon's fee transaction efficiency but if only that type of efficiency was directed at the IPMS, which was the "cause" of the LTE outage plaguing vzw networks. Glad they got rid of the fee and its continued work on the 4g situation. Now maybe I could enjoy my gnex or get the rezound.

  • boe

    Now if we could just get the FCC to investigate Sprint's policy of locking phones which violates the Carterfone legislation we might start making progress in lowering phone monthly pricing in the US.

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