23
Sep
motorola-xoom2-600x388

The Motorola XOOM was a truly unique device: it marked the beginning of the Android tablet era, stole a portion (admittedly a very small one) of the iPad 2's pre-announcement hype, and... weighed about as much as a tank driven by Chris Christie.

Well now its successor, the XOOM 2, has begun to hit the rumor mill - just a few minutes ago, Droid Life leaked two pictures of the slate:

motorola-xoom2-600x388 motorola-xoom2-2-600x445

We don't have a ton of information on the device as of yet, but DL's "sources" say that its weight is similar to that of the XOOM (!), and it has "big physical flush" buttons on its back, HDMI and microUSB ports on its bottom, and a SIM card slot. Notably absent? An SD card slot - though this was determined on "first glance," according to DL. There's nothing to report on the CPU front, either, though we would certainly hope that Moto has the good sense to justify the heft with a quad-core chipset.

Aesthetically, the slate looks nearly identical to its predecessor, save for the Photon 4G-esque angled corners. Additionally, the housing of the now-HD camera is blue, and the screen appears to be of the industry-standard 10.1-inch variety (note that this is merely an educated guess).

Though there's no word on the carrier to which the XOOM 2 is headed, our money's on Verizon, as they were the home of the first XOOM, and the SIM card likely points to an LTE radio (to be fair, AT&T is currently rolling out an LTE network of its own).

We're excited to see where Motorola takes this - it is the successor to the world's first Honeycomb device, after all - but we sincerely hope that they manage to trim down on the tablet's weight before it's released.

Source: Droid Life

Jaroslav Stekl
Jaroslav Stekl is a tech enthusiast whose favorite gadgets almost always happen to be the latest Android devices. When he's not writing for Android Police, he's probably hiking, camping, or canoeing. He is also an aspiring coffee aficionado and an avid moviegoer.

  • SparklingCyaNide

    I know a lot of people probably dislike the cut off corner look, but I think they look snazzy even if its a bit jarring at first.

  • TK

    I love the weight of my Xoom. It feels solid, not like a toy.

    • ocdtrekkie

      I agree, I find the Xoom weight comfortable.

      • xoomxoom

        i agree, if you have trouble with the xoom's weight... maybe you should consider getting off the couch and working out some, i want to hold something that feels like it is made well.. not a thin piece of plastic that feels like if i drop it that it is going to shatter into a thousand pieces. I stick with the original xoom, i believe it is better than most tablets out there if not all of them.

  • Tyler

    I'm guessing that the camera isn't blue but rather a sticker that comes on some of the motorola phones to keep the chrome from getting scratched up, but the only one i can remember specifically is the i9...

    • http://www.androidpolice.com/author/jaroslav-stekl/ Jaroslav Stekl

      The backside is definitely covered by a sticker of some sort, but I'm fairly certain the camera housing, which is an entirely different shade of blue, is actually painted and not just coated in plastic.

      • Tyler

        That's so weird, doesn't look good at all then :/

  • https://plus.google.com/117702410245683101961/posts Lucian Armasu

    I have a bad feeling about this. If they can't change the weight/thickness of the tablet in 8 months since the iPad 2 launched, while Samsung did it in only 2, and they still mess up the pricing for this one...then I don't know what to say about Motorola. Maybe they should stay out of the tablet market. But I'm hoping Google will point them in the right direction next year.

    Oh, and they better not dare release it with a display as poor as the first Xoom. I couldn't believe they would even put it on the market with such a poor display when I first played with it in a store. The iPad 2/Galaxy Tab 10.1 displays were at least twice as good.

    • ocdtrekkie

      I still haven't figured out what people have against the Xoom display. I think they are too picky. Auto-brightness is just a bad idea and you shouldn't use it, but other than that, it's fine.

      As far as thickness... again, still don't get it. :P All of my phones have been, by choice, as thick as the D1. One's a D3, one's a Bionic. Neither are iPhone 4 thin, and to be honest, I'm kinda glad their not sometimes. (Though the Bionic is pretty snazzy thin compared to my D1 and D3, of course)

  • James

    Like TK said.
    I like the weight of my Xoom. Every other brand I've held feels plasticy like its going to break.

  • ocdtrekkie

    Now, personally, I don't see the reason for a Xoom 2 at this point. I know Moto probably wants one for the chance to get the launch right, and try and get past the bad rep it got for the first launch, but there's really no need by specifications.

    Most tablets are still dual 1 GHz core atm, and I haven't found any apps that strain the capability of that yet. I don't see any "darn I wish I had a quad-core in this puppy" moments. I'm not sure I technologically see a need for a new version, and I certainly won't have any reason to upgrade anytime soon.

  • L boogie

    Now there's talk that it might be actually almost iPad 2 thin along some of the specs, can it be true along with no SD card slot?

  • jon

    had the WiFi xoom for a month. Will never buy another moto product, it was crap, and yes the screen was crap too. You really do need a good screen on a tablet because of all the different viewing angles you encounter, the xoom is horrible in this regard, had to hold it at just the right angle to get a good picture. Have a touchpad now and it makes a world of difference to have a quality screen. And the thing was buggy as he'll even though other hc tablets are not, so yeah, its the hardware. Plus the way they are treating their customers with the fiasco that has been the lte upgrade, why would you trust this company? Hopefully google will change things but I wouldnt hold my breath.

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