31
Aug
Screen shot 2011-08-31 at PM 05.44.47

A recent report from ComScore indicates that as of July 2011 82 million Americans own smartphones, with Android running on 41.8% of those devices, iOS on 27%, BlackBerry OS on 21.7%, Windows Phone on 5.7%, and Symbian on 1.9%.

The survey clearly indicates that significant gains have been made by Google and Apple at the expense of RIM, Microsoft, and Nokia.

Screen shot 2011-08-31 at PM 05.44.47

Additionally, the survey also looked at the market share of hardware manufacturers and interestingly Samsung was well ahead of the rest with 25.5% market share. I nearly choked when I first saw this figure as just a month ago Samsung's market share in the US was at a measly 8%. The apparent increase is not an increase at all as for this particular stat comScore surveyed all mobile users in the US, including (presumably) users of feature phones and smartphones. Overall there are 234 million Americans using mobile devices and this is split amongst Samsung, LG (20.9%), Motorola (14.1%), Apple (9.5%), and RIM (7.6%).

Although the top three spots are all held by Android manufacturers, HTC is nowhere to be seen. However, this should come as no surprise as HTC is a smartphone specialist.

Screen shot 2011-08-31 at PM 05.44.37

Finally, respondents of the survey were also questioned on the usage of their devices:

Screen shot 2011-08-31 at PM 05.54.23

Apparently, no-one makes phone calls any more.

Source: ComScore

Abhiroop Basu
Abhiroop Basu is an opinionated tech and digital media blogger. As a doe-eyed twenty-something he started his first blog TechComet to comment on anything tech-related that caught his omniscient eye. Since then he has blogged for Android Police, Make Tech Easier, and This Green Machine. In the real world, Abhiroop Basu is a resident of Singapore and the Editor of The Digit, a subsidiary of The Potato Productions Group.

  • Sorin

    Android could reach 50.8% by the end of the year if it maintains the same growth rate, while Apple will remain under 30%.

  • http://schpydurx.livejournal.com ProfessorTom

    This paragraph confused me:

    Although the top three spots are all held by Android manufacturers, HTC is nowhere to be seen. However, this should come as no surprise as HTC is a smartphone specialist.

    Could you clarify what you meant by that? My best guess as to the meaning of this paragraph is "the device manufactures in this chart also make dumb feature phones."

    • http://www.androidpolice.com/author/abhiroop-basu/ Abhiroop Basu

      Sorry about that upon re-reading I realised it may not have been clear. What I meant was that the other three manufacturers are all Android makers and HTC is the only other (main) Android player not in the list.

      • http://schpydurx.livejournal.com ProfessorTom

        The first sentence made sense. It was the second sentence that gummed up the works. I didn't (and still don't) understand how HTC being a Smartphone specialist would explain their absenteeism from the list.

        • http://www.androidpolice.com/author/abhiroop-basu/ Abhiroop Basu

          Because the stats are for all mobile device. Since smartphones make up about 1/3 of all mobile devices, if HTC is a smartphone specialist it's unlikely they have any (or few) feature phones and so would not be featured in the list.

        • http://schpydurx.livejournal.com ProfessorTom

          Ok. I get it now.

          Thanks for the help.

  • someone

    And you call yourself a professor :-)

    • http://schpydurx.livejournal.com ProfessorTom

      My original thesis was correct. The error here, of course, is doubting myself. :P

      • js

        PT you had it right when you first asked. Then his first answer confused it even more and then you had to ask again. Your only mistake was saying thanks for the help when it was he who messed up twice.

        • http://schpydurx.livejournal.com ProfessorTom

          Even a troll knows when to display a modicum of tact.