23
May
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Just in case you thought today would be devoid of some kind of fun, developer Hexage decided to release its latest game, Robotek. You play as the last human holdout on a robot-conquered Earth, slowly working from one base to take liberate nodes, countries, continents, and eventually the planet back from your oppressors. Combat plays out in a strategic, turn-based style, but there's a bit of a twist to it.

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You fight your robot enemies by spinning a virtual slot machine from which you gain bonuses, drone units and special attacks based on the outcome. This mechanic adds a bit of unpredictability to the game while still allowing you to plan your next move: the first tumbler moves slow enough that you can choose where it lands, but the second and third are more of a crapshoot. Matching more than one symbol awards you with powered-up versions of that outcome, while matching all three tumblers gives you another turn.

Combat is a bit hectic, but fun. Because the enemy has the same abilities you have (with the same degree of randomness) it's important to balance offense, defense and utility skills in order to achieve victory.

I was a big fan of Hexage's earlier title, Radiant, for the same reason; Robotek, like Radiant, is very easy to learn, hard to master and wrapped up in an intelligently-written package. I'll have a more in-depth review for you guys tomorrow, but for now I've recorded a video with a quick look at the gameplay and initial impressions.

The app is a free download for its full version; in the past, Hexage released "Lite" versions of its games, but that doesn't seem to be the case this time. The game was tested on a Motorola Atrix, so I'm not sure how well it runs on older systems. Scan the QR code or visit the market links to pick it up, and see if you agree with me tomorrow!

Matt Demers
Matt Demers is a Toronto writer that deals primarily in the area of Android, comics and other nerdy pursuits. You can find his work on Twitter and sites across the Internet.

  • Landrovan

    Why the permission: com.android.vending.BILLING

    • Coldman

      That's the permission for in-app billing. I think there are some levels you can buy later on, which is why the app is free. Consider it a Lite + Full version all in one.

  • Mark

    There is no skill, it's pure luck of the spin. Still good though.

  • oldmanofskye

    Been playing this game since last night and I have to say its definitely got some potential to become a superb game. Don't get me wrong - I do enjoy it as it is, just need a bit more variation when it comes to combinations, and an extra dose of tactics.

    Still, a GREAT game. And its free!

  • JarlSX

    love the game, even if a lot is based on luck

    but the fact you have to buy credits (thats what the billing permission is for) to be able to keep playing is just plain stupid.

    make a paid version and a version with ads, but not this nonsense

    just my 2 cents...

  • cooperaaaron

    Ok, this isn't based on Robotech, the anime ? I thought someone came out with a game based on that.... :(

  • http://delgadophotography.ca/blog Dave

    You start with 50 "Power". Each level is worth between 5-50 Power to play; if you win, you earn that much Power, if you lose, that's how much Power is subtracted from your total.

    Once you run out of Power, you have to buy more, in increments of 100 ($0.99), 300 ($1.99), or 600 ($2.99).

    You quickly run out of the cheap levels (5-15 Power) and start having to risk more to beat harder enemies each time you play.

    While the game itself is pretty fun - the payment model is both insulting and expensive. If I pay for a game, I want to own it; my phone is not a coin-op arcade.

    I uninstalled it the moment I discovered the pay-to-play scheme. Screw you Hexage, you're worse than Gameloft!

    • Sean

      yeah, I agree with what dave said...
      was loving the game till I ran out of power... (was winning/loosing about 50:50, then I got pumped 3 games in a row where the enemy just rolled 3 of the same thing 5 times in a row (giving them 5 attacked without me having a turn)
      I lost all my power... only way for me to continue to play is to pay...

      wish they would release a lite/full version...
      or if they wished to continue on this path, have it so your power resets once a day, or builds back up or something.

  • JarlSX

    hmmm, makes me wonder...

    maybe the game isnt fair all the time and makes you lose on purpose, so you have to buy more power?

  • Kyle

    How come I cant download this game on boost mobile samsung phone?please help

  • J Rush

    Wow...I love this game and it's the most addicting I've played in a while...for months actually. Allow me to explain:

    You don't need to buy power to continue in the game. If you have lost enough power as to not being able to continue anymore, just reset your Campaign and try again.

    Yes, this game requires skill. Luck has nothing to do with it. You have to know what you're doing and do it well. I've won 13 consecutive Campaign battles simply because I developed a STRATEGY. Strategy = Skill. And that's with poor luck of the draws.

    You can roll an infinite amount of perfects. The computer can roll a max of 3 in a row. Which even then is highly unlikely. I've rolled 3 Unmaker Omegas in a row, and I don't call that luck. I examine the roulette wheel and click on it accordingly. It's easy to determine the outcome if you watch it carefully enough.

    Yes, the computer does seem at times impossible to beat. But I've been in situations where I'm near death, and the computer seems unbeatable. But I've turned it around, and usually always end up winning. I will admit, it does get frustrating at times, but with a calm and positive attitude, you will overcome any battle.

    Just letting you guys know the truth of it, coming from a experienced player. And personally, I like the in app purchases. Gives me an edge when I feel like supporting the awesome Developer. And it only gets better from there...

  • Smit

    What is the promocode for this game

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