10
Mar
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Say you have some extra tickets to next week's A Flock of Seagulls concert that you want to unload, but you don't particularly want to stand outside of the gate four hours early, calling out "Need tickets?". Starting today, your Android phone can save you the time and humiliation. StubHub, the world's largest ticketing marketplace, has released an app into the Android Market.

Bought by eBay in 2007, StubHub is an online venue for buying and selling second-hand tickets. The popular website has been around for over 10 years, and thankfully, the new Android app does exactly what you would expect it to. On opening, you are presented with tabs for sports, concerts, and theatre. Maybe you aren't sure what you want to do and would just like to browse upcoming events for a night out? Hit 'use my location,' pick the category, and you will have a comprehensive list of events and prices in a matter of seconds.

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Using the StubHub app, I decided to see what kinds of fun events were coming up in my area. I noticed a Bulls game and found that I could be sitting courtside with a friend as they face the Jazz this weekend for a mere $5430. If my mental facilities were not functioning properly and I wanted to drop five grand on watching Utah play, I could simply click on the offer, check out with my Paypal account, and start painting my face red and black (thankfully, there are much more reasonable offers available as well).

Mobility may not be essential when using a service to buy or sell tickets (as the transactions will often be completed well in advance and through the mail), but I can see how having the marketplace packaged in an easy-to-use interface on an Android phone could certainly help more than a few people out. StubHub is available now for free in the Android Market. Check it out at the links below.

Download StubHub

Source: Android Market

Will Shanklin
Will's typical, run-of-the-mill story is that of 'classically-trained actor turned Android smartphone and tablet writer.' If you catch him quoting Shakespeare, it's not because he misses it, but because he desperately wants his Masters in drama to count towards something.

Sir William dwelleth in the fair haven
Chicago; with his fair maid'n Jess and his
trusty cur, Ziggy.